Showing 144 results

Authority record

Yanz, Lynda

  • Person
  • 1951-
Lynda Yanz currently is the Executive Director for Maquila Solidarity Network and President of the Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, Toronto, Canada.

Yaffe, Debby (Deborah)

  • Person
  • 1943-
Debby (Deborah) Yaffe is a feminist, activist and retired University of Victoria Department of Women’s Studies senior instructor. Yaffe (née Frisch) was born in 1943 and grew up in Southern California. She attended University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the 1960s. Taking her husband’s last name, Gregory, she and her husband lived in Europe with their son, moving to London in the 1970s. It was there, while working as a teacher, that Yaffe became involved in the women’s movement through her attendance at consciousness-raising group meetings. She subsequently formed her own group and took part in feminist actions. Yaffe later returned to the United States on her own and eventually settled in Victoria, British Columbia, with her family. After her divorce, she took her mother’s maiden name, Yaffe. In Victoria, she volunteered with Everywomen's Books, worked as a paid staff member for the local office of the Victoria Status of Women Action Group, from 1986 to 1988, and was involved in organizing around key issues such as abortion rights. Yaffe was approached to teach Introduction to Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 1990 and she retired in 2004. She holds a master’s degree in Women’s Studies and is a 2001 recipient of UVic Alumni Association’s award for excellence in teaching. Yaffe is one of the founders, along with former university archivist Jane Turner, of the Victoria Women’s Movement Archives at UVic Archives.

World Inter-Action Mondiale

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-
Founded in 1972 as the Ottawa-Hull Learner Centre, in the mid-1980s changed its name to World Inter-Action Mondiale (WIAM), and in 2011 changed its name again to One World Arts. WIAM was an Ottawa-based global education organization that believed that the solutions to social and economic global inequalities begin with awareness among Canadians of their social, environmental and cultural links with the rest of the world.

Working Women Community Centre

  • CA
  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

Working Women Community Centre (WWCC) was created in June 1974 in Toronto’s West End to help newcomer women with pre-employment and employment counselling. The Centre was specifically created to help women from Portugal, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The original name of the Centre was Women’s Community Employment Centre.

WWCC has responded to the needs of women in Toronto’s newcomer communities with creative, yet pragmatic, programs and services. In 1978, WWCC sponsored the Working Skills Centre, a mailroom on-the-job training program.

In 1984, WWCC helped develop the South Asian Women’s Centre, providing settlement services to South Asian women in Toronto. From 1985-1989, WWCC partnered with Humber College to offer the Electronics Assembler Program [Immigrant Women Into Electronics], providing immigrant women with skills for entry level electronics positions.

Since 1980, WWCC has provided immigrant women with an English as a Second Language program and a Language Instruction for Newcomers program, as well as offering computer training.

From 1980-1985, WWCC sponsored Modistas Unidas Workshop, an informal collective of skilled Portuguese-speaking dressmakers. This professional dressmaking business created an exclusive high-quality women’s clothing line.

In 2005, WWCC and its partners facilitated the Baker/Patisserie pre-apprenticeship training program. WWCC also partnered with organizations, in 2007, to provide immigrant women with pre-apprenticeship carpentry training.

As of 2014, WWCC serves all newcomer communities across the city, with office locations in the Jane/Finch, Don Mills/Sheppard/Peanut Town, Bloor West, and Victoria Village communities.

Wood, Myrna

  • Person
  • 1936-
Myrna Wood is an American Second wave feminist. She was born in Grundy County, Iowa, USA, the youngest child of family of 8. Her parents were Rolly and Fern Crouse Aiken. In 1966-1967 she was a member of a group of women in Toronto who started consciousness-raising meetings. She was one of the four authors of "Sisters, Brothers, Lovers... listen" for the final conference of SUPA (Student Union for Peace Action on Labor Day weekend 1967 in Goderich. During the next 2-3 years she lived and worked with Toronto Women's Liberation in Montreal, with the radical student movement at McGill and the other Women's Liberation groups. In New York City she helped to organize a city-wide Women's Liberation group (including women from Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Leviathan collective, etc.). In New York, during 1969, she co-wrote "Bread and Roses" with Kathy McAfee calling for a movement to organize working-class women. She also travelled to a peace movement meeting with the Vietnamese National Liberation Front in Cuba. This trip occurred at the time of the Weatherman takeover of the SDS Executive and during their planning of the Days of Rage at the Democratic Party Convention in Chicago. After the 1970 War Measures Act she lived in Hamilton for 20 years and was active in her CUPE Local and the Hamilton Union Movement. She continues to be active in local community groups in Picton, Ontario.

Womynly Way Productions

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-?
Formed in 1980, Womynly Way Productions is a non-profit organization producing professional concerts, dance, comedy and theatrical performances featuring primarily women artists. Making cultural events accessible to differently-abled people, including the hearing-impaired, and those who use wheel chairs, is stressed whenever possible. They also provide free childcare at all events.

Women's Studies Program, University of Ottawa / Progamme en Études des femmes, Université d'Ottawa

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1999
In the 1970s, a few pioneers women from various disciplines such as English, History, French Letters, Psychology, Political Science, Religious Studies and Sociology developed the first courses dealing with women's issues at the University of Ottawa. In the 1980s, a coordinating committee made up of professors and students from the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Social Sciences developed the framework for a program in Women's Studies. In 1983, the creation of a bilingual program in Women's Studies was officially approved by the Senate. The program is offered at the undergraduate level and is attached to the Office of the Vice-President, Academic. In 1985, the Department of the Secretary of State granted a Joint Chair in Women's Studies at the Universities of Ottawa and Carleton. In 1995, a fully bilingual, multidisciplinary program in Women's Studies at the Master's level was established. The objective of the program is to combine graduate studies in a particular discipline with the feminist approach and issues developed in Women's Studies. In 1999, the Women's Studies Institute replaced the Women's Studies program. In 2004, the Women's Studies Institute was transferred to the administration of the Faculty of Social Sciences. In 2014, the Women's Studies Institute becomes the Institute of Women's and Gender Studies. (Source : https://socialsciences.uottawa.ca/feminist-gender-studies/about-institute/milestones) / Dans les années 1970, quelques pionnières provenant de diverses disciplines telles que English, Histoire, Lettres françaises, Psychologie, Sciences politique, Sciences religieuses et Sociologie développement les premiers cours traitant de questions reliées aux femmes à l’Université d’Ottawa. Dans les années 1980, un comité de coordination constitué de professeures et d’étudiantes de la Faculté des arts et de la Faculté des sciences sociales, conçoit le canevas d’un programme en études des femmes. En 1983, la création d’un programme bilingue en études des femmes est approuvée officiellement par le Sénat. Le programme est offert au niveau du premier cycle et rattaché au cabinet du vice-recteur aux études. En 1985, le Secrétariat d’État accorde une Chaire conjointe en études des femmes aux Universités d’Ottawa et de Carleton. En 1995, un programme pluridisciplinaire entièrement bilingue en études des femmes au niveau de la maîtrise est mis en place. L’objectif du programme est de combiner des études de deuxième cycle dans une discipline particulière avec l’approche féministe et les problématiques développées en études des femmes. En 1999, l’Institut d’études des femmes remplace le programme en études des femmes. En 2004, l’Institut d’études des femmes passe sous l’administration de la Faculté des sciences sociales. En 2014, l'Institut d'études des femmes devient l'Institut d'études féministes et de genre. (Source : https://sciencessociales.uottawa.ca/etudes-feministes-genre/institut-bref/chemin-parcouru )

Women's Place

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

In early 1972, a group of women formed the Ottawa Women's Centre Association, and drafted a proposal for a centre which would allow women to meet and pool their skills and resources. The Ottawa Women's Centre (OWC) was the result of their proposal. The centre, offering meeting space, counselling, information and education, became the hub of women's liberation activity in Ottawa from its opening in July 1972 until its demise in 1980.

Like many grassroots feminist organizations of the 1970s, the Women's Centre wanted to avoid traditional methods of organizing; the aim was to leave as much power as possible in the hands of the members themselves. Consequently, the OWC was structured as a collective, run by staff, volunteers and members together, and using consensus to decide on centre policy and direction. However, as the Women's Centre grew, the need for more structured organization became apparent, and while the collective structure was maintained, in 1974 a Policy Committee was elected to be in charge of the major decisions. It was also decided, in 1973, that the centre would be off limits to men.

The Women's Centre offered diverse services which revolved mainly around crisis help, counselling, information and support of various kinds. They were also very active in the community, helping to organize a number of events, such as the Native Women's March to Ottawa in 1979, protests against federal cutbacks affecting poor women, and "reclaim the night" parades. They inspired, supported and helped to organize many other women's organizations in the Ottawa community, such as the Rape Crisis Centre, Women's Career Counselling, Interval House and Upstream, a women's newspaper. In 1975, the scope of their programs had grown so large that it was decided to split the two components of service and action. At that time, Women's Info, Referral and Counselling, while continuing to share the same space and Policy Committee, became a separate organization.

Financial support for the OWC came from a number of sources, including individual donations and support from other community organizations such as the Ottawa Women's Business and Professional Club. A major fundraising drive and benefit events were held in 1973, 1974 and 1976. The OWC also received grant money through the International Women's Year Program, the Local Initiatives Program and the City of Ottawa. In 1975, they were awarded a $10,000 grant from the Regional Municipality on the condition that they incorporate and register as a charitable institution. However, this decision was strongly opposed by some members who saw the potential for serious problems in reliance on government funding. These problems were illustrated the following year when the same grant was revoked. Although the decision was later reversed, the OWC was temporarily thrown into a funding crisis by the controversy.

In 1978 an open meeting was called to discuss the future of the OWC and it was decided that they would work towards becoming self-sufficient. A Business Committee was formed to help with this goal, and the result was the creation of Chez Nous, a small cafe which opened on the premises in February 1979. It was hoped that revenues from Chez Nous would allow the centre to survive without government support. Unfortunately, difficulties connected to their application for a liquor license threw them into even deeper financial trouble and they were forced to close in May 1980.

The idea for Women's Place/Place Aux Femmes originally grew out discussions with Mayor Marion Dewar held in January 1984. The community representatives and individuals who met with the Mayor felt there was a need for a centralized telephone information and referral service specifically for women.

A feasibility study on the need for such a service was commissioned in 1984 by an interim Board named Women's Info. The study confirmed the need for one source to co-ordinate and provide information on the services available to women. Those surveyed also pointed to the problem of gaps in service and the need for outreach and advocacy, and so it was agreed that, although the service would begin with information and referral, it would grow into the areas of support, advocacy and direct services.

In late 1984, while plans were being made for the new service, numerous concerns were raised about duplication of existing services, particularly with the Community Information Centre. To deal with these concerns, Women's Info decided to accelerate their growth plans and were given a grant of $10,000 to gather support and suggestions for the new proposal which included a wider range of services and a physical space for personal access and Centre activities.

Women's Info consulted the community extensively through mail-out questionnaires, pamphlets, and in-depth interviews, and discussions were also held with Community Information Centre representatives in an attempt to clarify respective roles and objectives. It was agreed that, besides providing information and referral, the new women's centre would also help identify and advocate for unmet needs and resources, and would work to heighten awareness of women's issues. The new proposal had extensive community support, and on October 16, Ottawa City Council approved funding. On June 12, 1986, Women's Place/Place aux Femmes officially opened at 242 Besserer Street.
From the beginning, Women's Place was concerned with reaching out to women who were isolated or disadvantaged because of age, ethnicity, poverty, disability or a combination of factors. Thus, their services, operating guidelines, and structure reflected the need to be inclusive and accessible. They did regular and extensive community outreach, established a francophone services collective and worked closely with other organizations to identify and work to solve problems caused by gaps in service. The Board was made up of both staff, volunteers and community members, and the organization was operated as a collective, with everyone sharing in the decision making process. Decision-making positions could not be held by men, although they could have limited access to services and information.

Like many women's organizations, Women's Place faced its share of financial problems, relying for funding on individual donations and government grants. In September 1986, only a few months after their official opening, their budget was reduced from $80,000 to $40,000, necessitating the cutting of 3 full time positions and many services. Another cut, in 1987, was met with a huge fundraising effort which included a reception for Bonnie Robichaud on Parliament Hill, film nights, a poetry reading, dances, a March for Peace and a music night. Since 1988, Women's Place/Place aux Femmes has relied mainly on grants from the provincial and local governments. In 1991, it moved from Besserer Street to Bruyere Street, where it rents the top half of a local community centre from the City.

The aims of Women's Place today are much the same as they were when it opened in 1986, but lack of funds has decreased the scope of their services somewhat. A lot of their work today is done in support of or in conjunction with other community and women's organizations.

Women's Liberation Bookmobile

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-1975

CORA was the creation of Judith Quinlan, Boo Watson and Ellen Woodsworth, three young women from Toronto who began planning the feminist bookmobile in 1973. They raised funds, promoted their plan, and bought and outfitted an old school bus, transforming it into a mobile library to promote information about women. A government grant provided the funding which got the wheels turning for the bus to begin its travels through rural Ontario in 1974.

Four other women joined them for the summer. “Women’s Liberation Bookmobile” was painted in large letters on CORA’s side. Inside the bus, racks held books (for sale, loan and to give away) by, for and about women, their history and the growing women’s liberation movement.

CORA was named for E. Cora Hind, a pioneer suffragist, grain grower and writer. The motivation for the travelling bookmobile was to make women’s books, periodicals and newspapers more readily available to women in small towns. Judith and Ellen wanted to help women in isolated situations find each other, facilitate communication and demystify women’s liberation, encourage schools, libraries and community centres to be aware of women’s resources and materials, and encourage women to write about their own experiences.

The women who operated CORA worked collectively, with a flexible attitude always open to new ideas. They would arrive in town, displaying their, “Women Working” sign, choose a conspicuous parking spot and then haggle with town officials for permission to park. Then they would set up, using an outdoor display rack (until it was run over in Huntsville!), distributing flyers about CORA, contacting local media, directly leafleting on the town streets.

Many women, young and old, from all backgrounds, visited CORA. Women’s groups were beginning to form in some locations, and CORA’s staff participated in meetings. The bookmobile carried information from women’s centres across Ontario and gave away literature. Women were delighted to see CORA the feminist bookmobile in their town.

The adventures of CORA were recounted in a Toronto feminist newspaper, The Other Woman, in 1975. In one town, Boo and Ellen got thrown out of the pool hall because, “there was no women’s washroom.” Camp counselors came and talked. One said, “This night might change my whole life.” The presence of CORA, the Feminist Bookmobile, in that summer of 1974, turned heads and raised consciousness.

Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF)

  • Corporate body
  • 1985-
Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF) is a national, charitable, non-profit organization, founded in 1985. LEAF works to advance the substantive equality rights of women and girls in Canada through litigation, law reform and public education using the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
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