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Geauthoriseerde beschrijving
Instelling

Voice of Women

  • Instelling
  • 1960-

Voice of Women began in 1960 when women across Canada were alarmed about the threat of nuclear war and how nuclear testing was endangering their children’s lives. Lotta Dempsey wrote columns in the Toronto Star asking women to write to her if they were willing to “do something” about this imminent danger. Hundreds replied. Four women, Jo Davis, Dorothy Henderson, Helen Tucker and Beth Touzel met with Lotta Dempsey and shortly thereafter “The Voice of Women” was established. Within months, thousands of women joined VOW that began to receive newsletters urging women to form small local groups to keep in touch with one another and to encourage all their female friends to join and unite for world peace.

Canadian Voice of Women for Peace (VOW) is a non-partisan Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) comprised of a network of diverse women with consultative status at the United Nations ECOSOC. For 55 years, VOW has tirelessly advocated for a world without war. An accredited NGO to the United Nations, affiliated to the Department of Public Information (DPI) and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), VOW was the Canadian lead group for peace at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. Members have been active in follow-up activities, including writing the chapter,”Women and Peace” in Take Action for Equality, Development and Peace.

They continue to exist today as part of a growing and select number of NGOs that provide women the opportunity to appeal to national government and international diplomats, attend conferences at the United Nations including the UN Commission on the Status of Women, and to write and present briefs and statements to political heads of state and nations worldwide on women and peace issues. They respond to calls for guidance and research on peace and women’s issues locally, nationally, and internationally. VOW is a non-partisan, non-religious organization that values women in all their diversities.

The Women's Press

  • Instelling
  • 1971-

The Women’s Press (also known as the Canadian Women’s Educational Press) was founded in 1971, by a subgroup of the Toronto Women’s Liberation Movement, one of the first feminist political organizations in Toronto. The initiative for a feminist press grew out of a dissatisfaction with the mainstream publishing community which had rejected Women Unite!, the first compilation of Canadian contemporary feminist writing. Their mandate was to provide an alternative means of making feminist ideas widely accessible and continue their involvement in the growing Canadian women’s movement. The Canadian Women’s Educational Press, more commonly known as the Women’s Press, was started officially on a grant from the Toronto Local Initiates Project (LIP) as a socialist feminist collective publishing feminist fiction, non-fiction and non-sexist children’s books.

In 1988 the Women’s Press began public discussion of an internal dispute regarding a proposed anti-racist policy. The discussions ended in a split within the Press with some original members departing to form the ‘Second Story Press’.

Women’s Press is Canada’s oldest English language feminist publisher. For over forty years, Women’s Press has played an integral role in the proliferation of high-quality Canadian writing in the fields of gender, sexuality, and women’s studies

Service, Office and Retail Workers of Canada (SORWUC)

  • Instelling
  • 1971-1986
The SORWUC began in 1971 with the Working Women’s Association of Vancouver and involved mainly unorganized women themselves. The group was also involved with public education about day care, job security, and equal pay. The union became formally organized and born from the Working Women’s Association of Vancouver in 1972 by a founding convention of 24 women, having the intention of creating SORWUC to represent organized occupations that were not yet included in the traditional trade unions at that time in Canada. The union aimed to overcome adversities faced by working women within these occupations by negotiating and bargaining for what they aimed to publicly educate their members on such as improve working conditions and provide job security. The union was able to branch out in three years’ time to include bank workers, and individuals from the finance industry. Having a presence primarily in British Columbia where the headquarters was located, SORWUC had a national presence in Canada due to Local sections of sisters and members in various cities. Local 7 was chartered in June 1982 for the region of Ontario and was based in Ottawa. After a decade of organized events and national presence, SORWUC ended operations in 1986.