Showing 145 results

Authority record

Women's Employment Centre (WEC)

  • Corporate body
  • 1981-1997
The Women's Employment Centre (WEC), located in Toronto, operated as part of the Canada Employment and immigration Commission (CEIC) and began under the launch of the Women's Employment Counselling Centre (WECC) Pilot Program in 1981. In this pilot program, seven employment centres with a particular focus on women's employment were opened in seven different cities across Canada as part of regular Canada Employment Centres in each city—Halifax, Chicoutimi, Toronto, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg and Calgary. WEC was created to assist women in entering the labour market and/or making major occupational changes, especially in non-traditional occupations (occupations that are predominantly male), such as trades, technology and operations (TTO).
The Women's Employment Counselling Centre (WECC) Pilot Program was evaluated in 1984 by Employment and Immigration Canada (the Program Evaluation Branch) and continued to operate throughout the 1990's. Many women who received advice and guidance from the WEC in Toronto were subsequently hired at various companies and organizations throughout Ontario including CP Rail, the Ministry of Transportation, CN, Toronto Transit Commission, the Toronto Star, and more. WEC eventually closed down in 1997 due to minimal support and a difficult political and economic climate within the Human Resource Development Canada (HRDC).

Women Working with Immigrant Women

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-?

Women Working with Immigrant Women (WWIW) was established in 1974, incorporated in 1985, with the goal of organizing workshops and sharing information to understand the problems and needs of Canada's growing immigrant population. WWIW sponsored workshops, courses, events, and programs, produced information kits, published books and articles, and produced a film. WWIW has also worked with other organizations to lobby the government for rights of immigrant women and women of colour, and to spread awareness about the issues encountered by immigrant communities in Canada.

In 1983, WWIW joined forces with the Coalition of Visible Minority Women to form the Ontario Immigrant and Visible Minority Women's Network. WWIW was also affiliated with the National Action Committee on the Status of Women and the National Organization of Immigrant and Visible Minority Women. In the 1990s, funding cuts caused WWIW to lose its core membership. By 1995, due to federal and provincial cutbacks, WWIW had lost so much of its funding that it could no longer support its staff. Although WWIW is no longer as active, it remains present in the Canadian women's movement, and was last seen in 2015 protesting discrimination against women wearing niqab.

Women Plan Toronto

  • Corporate body
  • 1985-2004

In 1982, a ground-breaking conference about gender perspective on urban issues was organized in Toronto by Women In/And Planning (WIAP). It sought to examine the underlying disconnections between urban planning practices and women’s needs.

In 1985, the creation of Women Plan Toronto (WPT) was inspired by an article in Women Environment about Women Plan London (WPL) in the UK. Reggie Modlich was a founding member of WPT and its main coordinator. It was supported by a grant from the federal government via the Status of Women agency as well as by WIAP.
Reggie Modlich defined WPT as ‘a grassroots women’s organization that uses participatory methods to involve diverse women in changing urban planning processes and outcomes in Toronto. Its purpose is to raise awareness and advocate alternatives for addressing women’s planning concerns’.

WPT was composed of a voluntary committee called ‘circles’ in order to avoid the traditional male hierarchical structure of organization. All members who attended a meeting could be part of the decision-making process. Thus, WPT started to exploring gender issues in urban planning by holding informal discussions. Women from various social backgrounds were invited to talk about their experiences and ideas relating to Toronto’s urban environment. The groups explored issues related to child care, public transit, personal safety, municipal governance and elections, housing, and urban planning.

Barbara Loevinger Rahder explains that ‘the structure of the organization, fluctuated with its memberships, depending on who is involved what their interests are, and what issues are on the public agenda (or put on the public agenda by WPT). There [was] one part-time staff member, and a core of about seven or eight volunteers who [were] usually very active in the circles and on various projects. Another fifty women or so [were] less active members, and up to another 3000 individuals and organizations [were] part of a broader network which [was] kept informed and sometimes mobilized around important issues and events’.

From 1985 to 1998, WPT took up various issues and started executing various projects. In this way, during the 1980s and 1990s, WPT had a direct impact on urban planning in Toronto: ‘For more than a decade, the organization has worked to focus attention on women’s needs in the city, to critique the inequities of mainstream planning, and to develop alternative visions of what planning and urban life would be like if women diverse needs were taken into account’.

In 2004, Toronto Women’s City Alliance (TWCA) succeeded WPT.

Women of Impact

  • Corporate body
  • 2014-2015
This project led by Mary Wells and Anne Millar, aimed to recognize and document the experiences and accomplishments of leading women in mining, metallurgy, and materials in Canada and throughout the world. Furthermore, it was designed to disseminate their inspiring stories through a one-day Women of Impact symposium as part of the 2015 Conference of Metallurgists (COM) and through a peer-reviewed publication, which was provided to key networks of women in science and engineering across Canada. The interviews took place during 2014-2015.

Women in Trades (WIT)

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-1989

The origins of the Women In Trades organization came out of a September 1979 meeting where women from several government agencies and educational groups met to come up with a strategy to help women already working in trades or as a starting point for women interested in entering non-traditional occupations. It was evident to the women at this meeting that there were problems with women in trade feeling isolated and not having a support group to discuss issues with. In spring 1980, a working committee was planning the founding meeting of Women In Trades association. This was held in June 1980.

Founding members of the group are Nancy Bayly and Jenny Stimac. There were always a small group but were committed to the cause. Mary Addison served as co-ordinator of the organization throughout the 1980s. Women In Trade helped women from both an educational and political perspective to make sure they received the guidance they needed. They were able to direct women to different training programs and also encourage them to act politically. There were workshops on how to lobby the government and speaking out publicly and also to attend rallies.

The central focus of the organization was to promote women in trade performing non-traditional work. This was an ongoing process. It involved convincing federal and provincial decision makers and labour unionists of the viability of women working in trades. They had to continually work at strengthening the relationship between tradeswomen, unions and employers. The membership of the group had a broad base. Women In Trade was open to women from different racial and ethnic backgrounds and also disabled tradeswomen. To be eligible for membership a women had to: work with her hands, belong to a particular skilled trade and paid hourly doing work with machines. Funding was always a challenge for this organization and they had to be constantly looking for sources of money. They looked to several different Ontario programs for assistance.

Webb, Nancy

  • Canada
  • Person
  • 1946-

Nancy Webb graduated from high school in 1963 and immediately entered the workforce. She was employed, at age 18, as a secretary for an electronics corporation in Etobicoke, Ontario. In 1979, Nancy Webb enrolled at York University while also working full-time, and later, while parenting her daughter; she graduated from York University in 1991.

In the spring of 1985 Nancy Webb attended a Women’s Studies’ course, Social Sciences 3580.06, taught by Dr. Meg Luxton. Subsequently, Nancy Webb worked as Fundraising and Community Relations Coordinator for the Elizabeth Fry Society in Toronto, for 30 years.

From ca. 1978-1980 Nancy also volunteered with the Lesbian Organization of Toronto. In 1984, she was part of the founding collective of the Notso Amazon Softball League in Toronto.

Wages Due Lesbians

  • Corporate body
  • 1973-1984

Prior to Wages for Housework’s demise, in the mid-1970s a group of lesbians which had belonged to it created a new organization, Wages Due Lesbians (also known as Wages Due). Their policies were much the same, however, their emphasis was on the rights of lesbian mothers. Their constitutional difference was that: “Wages for Housework recognizes that doing cleaning, raising children, taking care of men, is not women’s biological destiny. Lesbianism recognizes that heterosexual love and marriage is not women’s biological destiny. Both are definitions of women’s roles by the state and for the advantage of the state.” (Lesbians Organize, Toronto, Ontario, 1977)

The Wages Due Lesbians organization campaigned to have housework recognized as work and demanded the right to have relationships with other women. They also made demands to the government for paid daycare, so that lesbian women could work and keep their children. As with Wages for Housework, they were highly involved in campaigns, rallies and publishing articles on women rights and in particular lesbian mothers’ rights. The organization seems to have disbanded by the early 1980s.

Voice of Women

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

Voice of Women began in 1960 when women across Canada were alarmed about the threat of nuclear war and how nuclear testing was endangering their children’s lives. Lotta Dempsey wrote columns in the Toronto Star asking women to write to her if they were willing to “do something” about this imminent danger. Hundreds replied. Four women, Jo Davis, Dorothy Henderson, Helen Tucker and Beth Touzel met with Lotta Dempsey and shortly thereafter “The Voice of Women” was established. Within months, thousands of women joined VOW that began to receive newsletters urging women to form small local groups to keep in touch with one another and to encourage all their female friends to join and unite for world peace.

Canadian Voice of Women for Peace (VOW) is a non-partisan Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) comprised of a network of diverse women with consultative status at the United Nations ECOSOC. For 55 years, VOW has tirelessly advocated for a world without war. An accredited NGO to the United Nations, affiliated to the Department of Public Information (DPI) and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), VOW was the Canadian lead group for peace at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. Members have been active in follow-up activities, including writing the chapter,”Women and Peace” in Take Action for Equality, Development and Peace.

They continue to exist today as part of a growing and select number of NGOs that provide women the opportunity to appeal to national government and international diplomats, attend conferences at the United Nations including the UN Commission on the Status of Women, and to write and present briefs and statements to political heads of state and nations worldwide on women and peace issues. They respond to calls for guidance and research on peace and women’s issues locally, nationally, and internationally. VOW is a non-partisan, non-religious organization that values women in all their diversities.

Victoria Rape Relief Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-1982
The Victoria Rape Crisis Centre was established in 1975 by a group of women as a self-funded collective. It formed a coalition with other rape crisis centres in British Columbia in order to pool funding applications. The founders’ objectives were to provide rape crisis advocacy and to help women establish and increase control over their lives, to enquire into the causes of sexual violence, and to raise awareness about rape as serious crime. The centre employed two staff members, recruited several volunteers and was composed of different committees. The members aimed to develop a horizontal collective. The collective proposed presentations in high schools. They offered various workshops and courses on women’s self-defence, on-call counselling for women who had been raped or assaulted. They worked with the police in order to assist raped women and help them with the legal process. In 1977, the Victoria Rape Crisis Centre received a grant from the federal government to produce a booklet. Staff members and volunteers collaborate to produce the Booklet “Rape”. The Centre also participated to the creation of the Canadian Association of Sexual Assault Centres. It hosted a national conference in 1978 with the objective to form this association. The Victoria Rape Society was closed in 1982. The “Victoria Sexual Assault Centre” was founded the same year and opened its doors in 1983. Contrary to the original centre, the “Victoria Sexual Assault Centre” was not part of the British Columbia coalition crisis centres.

Veilleux, Denise

  • Person
Née à Montréal, Denise Veilleux s'est installée dans l'Outaouais après des études en traduction à l'Université Laval. En plus de travailler dans le domaine de la traduction, notamment au sein du gouvernement fédéral, elle a été chroniqueuse, co-animatrice puis réalisatrice de l'émission Ellipse diffusée sur les ondes de CHUO, la radio de l'Université d'Ottawa. Elle a également écrit des articles pour diverses revues et journaux dont la revue Femmes d'action et pour la Fédération nationale des femmes canadiennes-françaises (FNFCF). Denise Veilleux est une activitiste qui s’est consacrée aux questions d’intérêt pour les femmes, notamment la santé, l’éducation, la prévention de la violence et la lutte à la pauvreté et dans la lutte contre la mondialisation et contre la guerre. Elle s’est présentée comme candidate de l’UFP (Union des forces progressistes) dans le comté de Hull à l’élection d’avril 2003 et a été porte-parole nationale et vice-présidente de l’Union des forces progressistes (UFP). Elle habite à Winnipeg.
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