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Shepherd, Elizabeth

  • CA
  • Persoon
  • 1936-

Elizabeth Shepherd was born in London, England on 12 August, 1936. Her parents were Methodist missionaries in Burma where she spent her early childhood. She began her career as an actor in England before moving to Canada in 1972 to appear at the Stratford Festival Theatre. She has worked extensively there, as well as in the United States and in England, performing in theatre, movies and television. She teaches Shakespeare and the English classics and has held seminars/workshops at the Stratford and Shaw Festivals.

Elizabeth had been interested in women’s issues through Voice of Women for Peace but became more actively involved when she was inspired by Michele Landsberg’s description of the Women’s Action Coalition in the US. When it was decided to start a similar action in Canada, she became an enthusiastic member and was active throughout the 1990s. She was also involved in women’s organisations like METRAC, which raised awareness of violence against women, and has a special interest in women and the legal justice system. Elizabeth resides in New York. She has a son, Edmund Boys.

Overend, Valerie

  • CA
  • Persoon
  • 1953-

Valerie Overend was born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1953. During the 1990s, Valerie worked as a Red Seal Carpenter on commercial construction projects in the Regina area with the local Carpenters Union. Valerie had never met another woman on a construction site and knew that she wanted to do something to change that situation. She knew that women wanted to work in physical, creative, well-paying jobs but that they were limited by opportunity. She took advantage of her role as a summer instructor and moved into creating other programs for girls and women, maintaining the focus on career exploration in trades and technology. For the next 25 years, Valerie made her living expanding on that role until to her retirement.

In the 1970s, Saskatchewan Women in Trades & Technology (SaskWITT), a provincial organization that promotes and assists in the recruitment and training of girls and young women in predominantly male fields, was established. In the early 1990s, Valerie represented SaskWITT on the Board of the WITT National Network. That organization also developed programs to guide women into careers in trades and technology occupations. Valerie was on the team of WITT instructors from across Canada who met to develop National Standards and Guidelines for WITT programs in Canada. These were updated and revised again near the end of the decade to reflect changes in the landscape of trades and technology occupations. This work was fundamental in the development of curriculum resources that were introduced in all provinces and territories in Canada, many of them still in use.

In 1991, Valerie was approached by the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) to teach summer camps to introduce grades 7 and 8 girls to careers in trades and technology. With Valerie at the helm, SIAST campuses delivered summer Girls Exploring Trades and Technology Camps, GETT Alumnae workshops for high school girls, weekend Kids in the Shop Programs, a Kindergarten project where role models visited 60 classes each year, Women in Trades and Women in Technology Exploratory Programs, Career Fairs and variations of all of these for Aboriginal girls and women.

In 1995, she co-founded the Women’s Work Training Program in Regina, Saskatchewan. Throughout her career, Valerie sat on numerous Boards and Committees representing tradeswomen. These include the Saskatchewan Education Council, Saskatchewan Carpenters Trade Board, Saskatchewan Provincial Apprenticeship Board, the Saskatchewan Labour Market Initiatives Committee to the Canadian Construction Association, and the Women’s Reference Group to the Provincial Labour Force Development Board. Nationally, Valerie represented Saskatchewan as a Director of the Canadian Vocational Association, WITT NN, and CCWESTT. Through her involvement with these organizations, Valerie held Director positions with the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum and the National Women’s Reference Group on Labour Market Initiatives.

Aside from working directly with girls and women, Valerie began to work with employers and unions to resolve some of the barriers that conspired to keep women out of jobs in various industries. She worked both as a private consultant and as a consultant with WITT NN on various Employment Equity and Retention projects throughout the decade. Valerie’s work often involved travel, primarily in Canada. Over time, Valerie worked not only with the Construction Industry but also with Oil and Gas, and Mining Industries. She had contracts in Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories, and all of the Western Provinces and Ontario. As well, Valerie’s work once took her to Malawi in Africa.

When WITT NN dissolved in the early 2000s, Valerie was invited to work as a consultant to a project by the Canadian Coalition of Women in Science, Engineering, Trades and Technology (CCWESTT). This resulted in the formation of the WinSETT Centre, a mechanism established to expand and support women’s participation in Science, Engineering, Trades and Technology. Valerie became the Trades Consultant for the organization and worked to establish a pan-Canadian presence among unions, employers, and employer associations through delivery of programs and services.

Valerie has received both local and national recognition for her work. In 1992, she was awarded the Governor General’s 125 Medal for community volunteerism and she also recognized by the YWCA Regina as a Woman of Distinction. In 2005, Valerie received the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal. These awards recognize her dedicated work as a role model inspiring young women in non-traditional fields.

Gallagher, Dawna

  • Persoon
Dawna Gallagher-Moore was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She is a visual and performance artist, and also a visual researcher of Canadian cultural history. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), and a Masters of Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She has completed doctoral studies and an oral examination in Canadian History at the University of Ottawa. In 1986, she received the Brucebo Canadian-Scandinavian Scholarship for landscape painting and spent a summer painting and bicycling around Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea. She worked for Library and Archives Canada. She also has taught painting, drawing, watercolour, cartooning and art history. She is best known for her cryptic, witty, and pointed cartoons published in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Ottawa, and New-York. She now runs TreeTop Art Studio, which offers workshops and art classes for children and adults in Ottawa, Ontario. She is married to the writer and editor John P. Moore.

Yaffe, Debby (Deborah)

  • Persoon
  • 1943-
Debby (Deborah) Yaffe is a feminist, activist and retired University of Victoria Department of Women’s Studies senior instructor. Yaffe (née Frisch) was born in 1943 and grew up in Southern California. She attended University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the 1960s. Taking her husband’s last name, Gregory, she and her husband lived in Europe with their son, moving to London in the 1970s. It was there, while working as a teacher, that Yaffe became involved in the women’s movement through her attendance at consciousness-raising group meetings. She subsequently formed her own group and took part in feminist actions. Yaffe later returned to the United States on her own and eventually settled in Victoria, British Columbia, with her family. After her divorce, she took her mother’s maiden name, Yaffe. In Victoria, she volunteered with Everywomen's Books, worked as a paid staff member for the local office of the Victoria Status of Women Action Group, from 1986 to 1988, and was involved in organizing around key issues such as abortion rights. Yaffe was approached to teach Introduction to Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 1990 and she retired in 2004. She holds a master’s degree in Women’s Studies and is a 2001 recipient of UVic Alumni Association’s award for excellence in teaching. Yaffe is one of the founders, along with former university archivist Jane Turner, of the Victoria Women’s Movement Archives at UVic Archives.

Canadian Women’s Studies Association (CWSA)

  • Instelling
  • 1982-

The Canadian Women’s Studies Association (CWSA) was founded in 1982 at the Learned Societies’ Conference in Ottawa. As a bilingual association of Women’s Studies practitioners across Canada, the CWSA’s mandate is to provide a professional network for Women’s Studies specialists and to promote and foster women’s studies as an academic discipline. The CWSA was a member of the Canadian Humanities Federation, the Social Science Federation of Canada and later, when these two organizations merged, the Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada (HSSFC). In conjunction with the HSSFC, they sponsor an annual conference. The CWSA has published a biannual newsletter since 1982.

In 1992, the CWSA issued its first conference programme entitled Weaving alliances: selected papers presented for the Canadian Women’s Studies Association at the 1991 and 1992 Learned Societies Conferences. The CWSA took over the publication of Atlantis, originally a women’s studies journal issued by Mount Saint Vincent University in 1994 when its publication was suspended due to internal disputes.
In 1993, in response to gender equity issues uncovered at the University of Victoria Political Science Department and on other Canadian campuses, the CWSA launched the Chilly Climate Committee to investigate the issue and propose remedies. In 1998, the CWSA website was launched and a cyber-committee was created in order to keep the association apprised of issues concerning women and new communications technology.

Since 2002, Atlantis, under the aegis of the CWSA, has sponsored an annual prize for a monograph in either French or English published during the previous year. The Book Prize was renamed in 2011 to the Outstanding Scholarship Prize. In 2004, the CWSA introduced both the Undergraduate and Graduate Essay Prizes. The essays are anonymously judged by a committee of 3-5 members.

The CWSA continues to promote Women’s Studies as an academic discipline and it continues to sponsor conferences and publish periodicals on the subject.

Advocates for Community-based Training and Education for Women (ACTEW)

  • Instelling
  • 1988-2008
ACTEW, originally Advocates for Community-based Training and Education for Women, was a provincial membership organization for programs that provided community training to women. It began in 1988 as an outgrowth of another provincial umbrella group, ONESTEP, Ontario Network of Skills Training and Employment Programs. The women's organizations belonging to ONESTEP decided they needed a more women-centered, feminist organization to represent their specific needs. ACTEW changed its name in 2004 to A Women's Training Community. Over the years that ACTEW existed the organization published many reports, briefs and responses to government initiatives including: Access Diminished: A report on women's training and employment services in Ontario (2001); Challenges and Connections: Meeting the Information Needs of Professionals Working with Immigrant Women (2001), Operation Access (1989), Choosing Training, Shortcuts to Career Development Resources for Girls and Women. The group dissolved in 2008 due to lack of funding.

Fireweed

  • Instelling
  • 1978-2002

Fireweed was founded in Toronto, Canada, in 1978 by a 24 women collective. Originally called Fireweed: A Women’s Literary and Cultural Journal, the journal adopted the name Fireweed: A Feminist Quarterly of Writing, Politics, Art & Culture in 1980. The foreword to the first issue described Fireweed as a “feminist journal devoted to stimulating dialogue, knowledge, and creativity among women” and stated that the journal’s collective was “committed to an editorial policy of diversity.” Collective members have included Gay Allison, Lynne Fernie, Hilda Kirkwood, Liz Brady, Elizabeth Ruth, Makeda Silvera, Carolyn Smart and Rhea Tregebov. Issues of Fireweed usually focuses on a theme or topic, such as "Writing" (#10), "Fear & Violence" (#14), "Women of Colour" (#16), "Sex & Sexuality" (#37 & 38), and "Language" (#44/45), though there are frequent "open" issues. They published the first collection of Jewish feminist works (#35) to critical acclaim. Beginning in 1982, Fireweed invited guest collectives to edit issues of the journal. This was an opportunity for under-represented groups to define their own issues.

Fireweed was committed to an editorial policy of diversity and not intended to represent a particular style or aesthetic. The collective was also committed to print both established and new women authors including works from native and immigrant communities. However, in the beginning of their history Fireweed did not completely adhere to this mandate. Most of their first issues included little or no works from writers of colour, native women, or immigrants. This exclusion created some adverse reactions from the community. By 1982, all but one woman resigned from the original collective and a new eight woman collective was formed. This collective, which included two women of colour, argued extensively about the aesthetics and contents of the journal. By the mid- to late-1980s and beyond, Fireweed began to paint a broader discussion of race, class, and sexuality. Several themed issues that gave voices to minority groups including two issues on Asian women’s writings, Lesbiantics: an issue for and by lesbian women, and a double issue on class. Even though they received letters about certain issues, themes, and writings, Fireweed never compromised their vision. The journal published fiction, poetry, reviews, essays, photographs, and drawings from women around the world. The collective encouraged women from every background to submit their works to the journal. They wanted women to articulate how they were perceived in popular culture. They had an extensive editorial system that involved a group consensus when considering submissions.

The Fireweed collective also wanted to encourage and support women to pursue writing and other arts. They continuously participated in the Ontario Arts Council’s Writer’s Reserve grant system that provided Fireweed the opportunity to recommend funding to writers for individual projects. Their continued work with the arts community created an annual Fireweed festival, which showcased various artists and works from the feminist community. The journal also showcased writing from a number of renowned Canadian artists including Margaret Atwood and Rina Fraticelli, the future head of Studio D at the NFB. Similarly to many other publications, the collective system was not entirely efficient or beneficial to the journal and began to show strain in 1983. By the mid-1990s a new organization was developed to better manage the publication of the journal. First, a 6-member editorial collective was responsible for the editorial direction especially with the development, solicitation, and selection of issue contents. The staff collective included coordinators for sales and marketing, editorials, office management, and the design of the journal itself. Finally the board collective as the legal entity was responsible for overall organizational and staff issues as well as all fiscal matters.

Fireweed was published from 1978 to 2002 with a final double issue on women, race, and war resistance. The quarterly's ISSN is 0706-3857.

Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women

  • Instelling
  • 1979-2001
The Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women (CCLOW) is a national organization which was formed in 1971 to promote learning opportunities for women. It facilitated networking, identified barriers, publicized critical issues, organized conferences, and publishesda periodical, Women’s Education des femmes. CCLOW was originally called the Canadian Committee on Learning Opportunities for Women. The Quebec regional chapter was formed in circa 1979 and CCLOW disbanded in 2001.

Frize, Monique

  • Persoon
  • 1942-

Monique Frize, née Aubry (1942 - ), is a Canadian researcher and engineer in the biomedical field. She was the first women to study engineering at the University of Ottawa and graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science (Electrical Engineering) in 1966. She received an Athlone Fellowship and completed a Master’s in Philosophy in Electrical Engineering (Engineering in Medicine) at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London (United Kingdom), a Master’s of Business Administration at the University of Moncton (New Brunswick), and a doctorate from Erasmus Universiteit in Rotterdam (The Netherlands).

Monique Frize worked as a clinical engineer for 18 years. She started her career at the Hôpital Notre-Dame in Montreal. In 1979, she was appointed Director of the Regional Clinical Engineering Service in Moncton (New Brunswick) and became the first Chair of the Division of Clinical Engineering for the International Federation of Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) in 1985. In 1989, she was appointed the first holder of the national Northern Telecom/NSERC Chair for women in engineering at the University of New Brunswick, and professor in the Electrical department. In 1990, she was named chair of the Canadian Committee for Women in Engineering (CCWE). In 1997, she joined Carleton University, as a Professor in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, and the University of Ottawa, as a Professor in the School of Information Technology and Engineering. She also held the Ontario NSERC/Nortel Chair for women in science and engineering. She is a founding member of International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES) and was its president between 2002 and 2008. In 2007, she founded INWES Education and Research Institute (ERI) and has been its president since then.

As a biomedical engineer, Monique Frize is knowledgeable in medical instruments and decision support systems. She developed a software program to predict complications in premature babies and perfected a technique that uses an infrared camera to detect the presence of arthritis. Throughout her career, she has been active in promoting women in leadership roles in science and engineering. As a role model for women engineers, she taught, conducted research, and lead campaigns to encourage young women to pursue careers in engineering. She is the author of more than 200 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals and proceedings. She has published several books such as The Bold and the Brave: A history of women in science and engineering (2009), Laura Bassi and Science in 18th Century Europe (2013), Ethics for Bioengineers (2011), and Health Care Engineering Parts I and II (2013). She has received many honours and awards including honorary doctorates from several Canadian Universities. She was inducted as Officer of the Order of Canada in 1993.

Women of Impact

  • Instelling
  • 2014-2015
This project led by Mary Wells and Anne Millar, aimed to recognize and document the experiences and accomplishments of leading women in mining, metallurgy, and materials in Canada and throughout the world. Furthermore, it was designed to disseminate their inspiring stories through a one-day Women of Impact symposium as part of the 2015 Conference of Metallurgists (COM) and through a peer-reviewed publication, which was provided to key networks of women in science and engineering across Canada. The interviews took place during 2014-2015.
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