Showing 147 results

Authority record

Sylvia Spring

  • Person
  • 1942-
Sylvia Spring is born in Galt, Ontario on July 14, 1942. She is a Canadian feminist writer, filmmaker, and activist. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts from the State University of New York at Buffalo in English Literature and Drama. After graduating, she wrote poetry and worked in advertising, journalism, radio, and television. In 1970, she produced Madeleine is…, the first Canadian English-language feature film directed by a woman since Nell Shipman in 1919. A segment of the film was released as a short feature under the name Madeleine and won an award at the Vancouver International Film Festival in 1970.
In 1979, she was appointed to the Task Force on Sex-Role Stereotyping in the Broadcast Media established by the Canadian minister responsible for the status of women. The Task Force was meant to examine the portrayal of women in popular media and developed guidelines for its improvement. Then, Sylvia Spring co-founded MediaWatch Canada, a watchdog organization dedicating to eliminating sexism in the media and became its first National Director. Sylvia Spring has spoken in national and international forums to raise awareness about the representation of women in the media. She has designed and facilitated workshops and lectures for agencies such as the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), and the United Nations Educational, Social and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In January 2000, as a communication consultant, she travelled to China with Bonnie Diamond, NAWL’s executive Director, to conduct workshops with grassroots Chinese women on the information dissemination techniques used by women’s group in Canada (Nawl.ca, consulted 2021-06-02).
In 1995, she produced Voices and Visions, a documentary series from the UN World Conference on Women held in Beijing, China. In 1996, she produced the documentary Breaking the Silence: Stories from AIDS Activists in Southern Africa. The documentary tells the stories of women working at the front lines of the AIDS epidemic. In 2000, she produced 20th Century Gals (According to Babe), which explored the women's movement of the 20th century. In 2005, she co-produced Our bodies...their battleground, a documentary about the sexual violence crisis facing women and girls in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia.

Smith, Wilbert B.

  • Person
  • 1910-1962
Wilbert B. Smith was a Canadian radio engineer and UFOlogist. Mr. Smith joined the Department of Transport in 1939 and was in charge of establishing a network of ionospheric measurement stations. Interested in UFOs since the 1940's, Mr. Smith eventually instituted Project Magnet with the Department of Transport in November 1950. The purpose of the project was to collect data on UFOs and to potentially use that data to inform human technology and engineering. Before the program dissolved in 1954, he concluded that flying saucers did exist and that they operate on magnetic principles. In 1952 he was also part of an interdepartmental government committee of scientists and military officers set up to investigate UFO reports, known as Project Second Story/Storey. The committee met five times.

Slovak Studies Association (SSA)

  • Corporate body
  • 1977-

The Slovak Studies Association (SSA) was founded in 1977 in Washington, D.C. during the National Conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS). Attending this first meeting were Thaddeus Gromeda, Richard Liba, Thomas Marzik, Jozef and Renee Mikuš, Mark Stolárik, Anthony X. Sutherland and Edward Tuleya. The purpose of this first meeting was to discuss a tentative constitution, enabling the secretary-treasurer, Mark Stolárik, to write its first draft, and to elaborate the procedures for the election of SSA’s officers. Procedures pertaining to the election of SSA officers were also elaborated during this reunion.

The SSA promotes interdisciplinary research, publications and teaching relating to worldwide Slovak experience. This scholarly organization assists scholars interested in Slovak studies, sponsors panels on Slovak history and themes (i.e. “14 March and the Slovak State“ and “Slovak Literature as a Mirror of National Awakening“), and issues a bi-annual newsletter. In addition, the SSA “conducts all of its activities in accordance with academic freedom and completely devoid of partiality to any philosophical, political, or religious orientation“. The SSA is affiliated to the Association for Slovak, East European and Eurasian Studies (ASEES) (formerly the Association for Advancement of Slovak Studies). In 1983, the SSA was incorporated to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a non-profit scholarly organization.

Sistren Theatre Collective

  • Corporate body
  • 1977-
Sistren Theatre Collective was established in 1977 in Kingston, Jamaica and is an independent organization. It uses theatre to explore issues of discrimination faced by working-class black women. Since 1980 it has travelled throughout Jamaica, the Caribbean, North America, Europe and Africa performing plays and engaging with women.

Shufelt, Laura

  • Person
  • ca. [1890-1970]
Lived on Cartier Street in Ottawa, Ontario.

Shepherd, Elizabeth

  • CA
  • Person
  • 1936-

Elizabeth Shepherd was born in London, England on 12 August, 1936. Her parents were Methodist missionaries in Burma where she spent her early childhood. She began her career as an actor in England before moving to Canada in 1972 to appear at the Stratford Festival Theatre. She has worked extensively there, as well as in the United States and in England, performing in theatre, movies and television. She teaches Shakespeare and the English classics and has held seminars/workshops at the Stratford and Shaw Festivals.

Elizabeth had been interested in women’s issues through Voice of Women for Peace but became more actively involved when she was inspired by Michele Landsberg’s description of the Women’s Action Coalition in the US. When it was decided to start a similar action in Canada, she became an enthusiastic member and was active throughout the 1990s. She was also involved in women’s organisations like METRAC, which raised awareness of violence against women, and has a special interest in women and the legal justice system. Elizabeth resides in New York. She has a son, Edmund Boys.

Sexual Assault Centre of Brant

  • Corporate body
  • 1993-
In 1988 a group of women who sought to provide support to victims of sexual assault at the community level came together to form the Brant Sexual Assault Awareness Committee. They aimed to increase any services that existed for sexual assault victims; educate Brant County residents regarding the extent of sexual assault, and to advocate for the development of local services. In 1990, funding from the Ontario Women's Directorate and Secretary of State enabled a survey to be carried out, the results of which overwhelmingly called for sexual assault services to be established. In 1991 under the NDP government the Sexual Assault Centre of Brant was formed and it continues to offer this support today to women in Brant County who are survivors of sexual violence and to the people who support these survivors. They offer individual and group counselling, public education, advocacy, resources, and accompaniments to the court, police, or hospital. All of their services are open to women 16 and over in Brant County. The crisis line is open to survivors of sexual violence (female or male) or a friend or family member of someone who has experienced sexual violence.

Section of Women and Psychology of the Canadian Association of Psychology (SWAP-CPA)

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-
The Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP) is a community of researchers, teachers, and practitioners interested in the psychology of women and feminist psychology. It aims to advance the status of women in psychology, to promote equity for women in general, and to educate psychologists and the public on topics relevant to women and girls. It supports students through an annual student paper award and a convention social event. Members are kept informed of developments via annual newsletters and are connected through the CanFemPsyc listserv and other online groups. SWAP members regularly organize symposia and pre-conference institutes as well as supporting a Status of Women Committee.

Second Wave Feminism Oral History Collection

  • Corporate body
  • 2007-2012

The Second Wave Feminism Oral History Collection is the result of the findings from the Second Wave Archival Project, a research project organized by Canadian Senator Nancy Ruth and Beth Atcheson. Interviews were conducted by Bronwyn Bragg (lead researcher and interviewer) and Mary Breen. The Second Wave Archival Project aimed to document the history of second wave feminism in Canada. The final oral history collection includes 99 interviews with women from Alberta, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Ontario, Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

The Second Wave Archival Project was a collaboration between Nancy’s Very Own Foundation (NVOF) and the University of Ottawa Library Archives and Special Collections. NVOF is a private foundation in Toronto founded by Senator Nancy Ruth. The interviews are part of the Canadian Women’s Movement Archives (CWMA) at the University of Ottawa Library. Bronwyn Bragg was employed from 2008-2010 by NVOF and later published a master’s thesis from the University of Toronto in 2011 titled “Deconstructing ‘Hegemonic Feminism’: The Emergence of ‘Second Wave’ Feminism in Canada (1965-1975)”. In this thesis Bragg also outlines the history of the project.

The oral history interviews were digitally recorded and conducted primarily in person. Some were done over the phone. The interviews conducted in Ontario are accompanied by transcripts done by Bronwyn Bragg.

In 2007, the original intention of the project was to collect documents and ephemera relating to second wave feminism in Canada. Then it was decided to collect oral history interviews instead when locating documents proved more difficult than anticipated. Initially ten women in Ontario were on the list of interviewees. However, the list of interviewees grew and more than forty interviews had been recorded by Bronwyn Bragg by October of 2008.

A goal of the project was to reflect the diversity of the second wave movement in Canada by including experiences from women of colour, aboriginal women, women with disabilities, and women who identify as LGBTQ2S+ as outlined in Bragg’s master’s thesis. Interviews with women who were active early on in the movement were prioritized as were interviews with the eldest women outlines Bragg.

An interview guide and consent form was created for the interviews. The consent form states that recordings will become the property of uOttawa and included in the Canadian Women’s Movement Archives, interviewees can restrict access to their interviews if desired, and receive a copy of their interview, etc. Lawyers working on the project drafted the consent form with input from the University of Ottawa Library Archives and Special Collections. The content of the consent form was reviewed before and after the interview with the interviewee. Once the interview had been conducted, participants were asked to sign the form and stipulate any access restrictions.

The interview guide was created in collaboration with other feminist academics in history and sociology. Questions in the guide were general and open-ended. The interview guide consisted of a list of questions grouped into four categories. The first being to capture stories for the next generation of feminists and to create permanent archival records for future research. The first section of questions dealt with how participants became involved with feminism, the second dealt with organizational affiliations and group memberships, the third dealt with how participants felt to be part of the movement, the fourth about what participants thought was important for young feminists today. The participants were not sent the interview guide before the interview unless they requested it. A list of open-ended demographic questions was appended to the guide to serve as follow up questions. This was done to ensure all relevant information had been captured during the interview.

Two goals were stated in the guide. The first being to capture stories for the next generation of feminists and to create permanent archival records for future research on second wave feminism in Canada.

Royal Commission on the Status of Women

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-1970
The Royal Commission on the Status of Women was a Canadian Royal Commission that examined the status of women and recommended steps that might be taken by the federal government to ensure equal opportunities with men and women in all aspects of Canadian society. The Commission commenced on 16 February 1967 as an initiative of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson with Florence Bird as the chair. Public sessions were conducted the following year to accept public comment for the Commission to consider as it formulated its recommendations. The report tabled on 7 December 1970 included 167 recommendations for reducing gender inequality across the various spheres of Canadian society.
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