Showing 143 results

Authority record

International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES)

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-
INWES is the International Network for Women Engineers and Scientists. It is a global non-profit organization that serves to strengthen the capacity of individuals and organizations related to women in STEM worldwide through the exchange of information, networking, and advocacy activities to increase the presence of women in STEM worldwide and to be a responsible voice and influence on scientific issues for the benefit of society and the environment. The International Conference for Women Engineers and Scientists (ICWES) had been taking place for twelve years before delegates decided to create a network of organizations that represent women in STEM fields in 2001. In 2003, INWES was declared a non-profit corporation under Canadian law. INWES continues to exist as an organization and it sponsors workshops, conferences, and research, publishes a newsletter, and hosts regional meetings throughout the world.

Section of Women and Psychology of the Canadian Association of Psychology (SWAP-CPA)

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-
The Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP) is a community of researchers, teachers, and practitioners interested in the psychology of women and feminist psychology. It aims to advance the status of women in psychology, to promote equity for women in general, and to educate psychologists and the public on topics relevant to women and girls. It supports students through an annual student paper award and a convention social event. Members are kept informed of developments via annual newsletters and are connected through the CanFemPsyc listserv and other online groups. SWAP members regularly organize symposia and pre-conference institutes as well as supporting a Status of Women Committee.

Ontario Advisory Council on Women's Issues (OACWI)

  • Corporate body
  • 1985-1993
The Ontario Advisory Council on Women's Issues (OACWI) was founded in 1984. It was the successor to the Ontario Advisory Council on the Status of Women (OACSW), founded in 1973 in response to the 1970 federal Report of the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Succesful lobbying by women's groups pushed the Ontario government to expand the capacity of OACWI and it was charged with advising the government on women’s issues through a special minister. The Conservative government decided to fold the OACWI in 1996.

Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF)

  • Corporate body
  • 1985-
Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF) is a national, charitable, non-profit organization, founded in 1985. LEAF works to advance the substantive equality rights of women and girls in Canada through litigation, law reform and public education using the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Antoine, André

  • Person
  • 1858-1943
André Antoine est un comédien, metteur en scène, directeur de théâtre, réalisateur et critique dramatique français né le 31 janvier 1858 à Limoges et mort le 19 octobre 1943 au Pouliguen. Considéré comme l'inventeur de la mise en scène moderne en France, il a donné son nom au Théâtre Antoine à Paris.

Beadle, Gert

  • Person
  • 1915-2001
Gert Beadle was born in 1915 and grew up in a farming community outside of Fort Frances, Ontario where she ran the general store & post office. In 1952 she moved with her husband Ralf, to Thunder Bay, Ontario where she was a nurse and became active in the women's movement. She helped establish the Women’s Crisis Homes Incorporated, which grew to include a women’s centre, a rape crisis line, a women’s health collective, a women’s credit union, and a feminist newspaper. She was also a board member of the Thunder Bay Women's Centre and a founding member of the Northern Women's Credit Union. She was also the first president of Crisis Homes Inc. '76, an organization providing support services to battered women. In 1985 she moved to Kelowna, BC where she spent the rest of her life. Member of the collective Northern Woman's Journal, she has published many articles and two volumes of poetry and an essay: Salt and Yeast, Selected Poems (1977), Rising: selected poems (1980) and The resisting spirit (1984). The Kelowna Women’s resources Centre created the Gert Beadle Award in her memory. This award recognizes the value of invisible work done at the community level to enhance women’s equality. Gert Beadle passed away July 11, 2001 at Kelowna, BC at the age of 86.

Yanz, Lynda

  • Person
  • 1951-
Lynda Yanz currently is the Executive Director for Maquila Solidarity Network and President of the Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, Toronto, Canada.

Veilleux, Denise

  • Person
Née à Montréal, Denise Veilleux s'est installée dans l'Outaouais après des études en traduction à l'Université Laval. En plus de travailler dans le domaine de la traduction, notamment au sein du gouvernement fédéral, elle a été chroniqueuse, co-animatrice puis réalisatrice de l'émission Ellipse diffusée sur les ondes de CHUO, la radio de l'Université d'Ottawa. Elle a également écrit des articles pour diverses revues et journaux dont la revue Femmes d'action et pour la Fédération nationale des femmes canadiennes-françaises (FNFCF). Denise Veilleux est une activitiste qui s’est consacrée aux questions d’intérêt pour les femmes, notamment la santé, l’éducation, la prévention de la violence et la lutte à la pauvreté et dans la lutte contre la mondialisation et contre la guerre. Elle s’est présentée comme candidate de l’UFP (Union des forces progressistes) dans le comté de Hull à l’élection d’avril 2003 et a été porte-parole nationale et vice-présidente de l’Union des forces progressistes (UFP). Elle habite à Winnipeg.

Healthsharing

  • Corporate body
  • 1978-1993

Healthsharing was a Toronto-based publication concerned with examining women’s health issues and alternatives to mainstream health care from a feminist viewpoint and it has been called “Canada’s first women’s health magazine”. The Healthsharing Collective was comprised, for the most part, of volunteer labour and regularly a minimum of two paid staff members. It was officially incorporated in 1978 and published quarterly between 1979 and 1993. It is clear from the collection of letters which flowed into the Healthsharing Collective office on a regular basis that the magazine was well received and was an integral part of women’s health activism during the fourteen years of its existence. Although the first years of publication ran smoothly, it soon became increasingly difficult for the magazine to survive and much of the energy of the collective was spent not only on maintaining and improving the magazine, but also on advertising and soliciting funding from government and other agencies. In 1990, the Conservative government cut the Secretary of State’s Woman’s Program and this hit Healthsharing hard. Although the magazine managed to survive for three more years thanks to donations from supporters, subscription renewals and a transfer of $344,000 in grant funds originally intended for a regional women’s health network, they published the last issue in fall 1993.

The administrative records are incomplete and run from 1984 to 1993 and largely reflect the beginning of the Collective. Despite Secretary of State funding in the mid-1980s, pressure to obtain more funding for expansion was crucial. While the notion of expansion was clearly an exciting one, their concepts and methods of collective organizing based on devoted volunteer efforts made obtaining stable funding difficult. The collective continued for many years in this way, at times successfully soliciting additional funds for special issues through Health and Welfare and Employment and Immigration work programs. In this way, they were occasionally able to pay extra staff.

Although the magazine was run through a collective editorial board in order to create a feminist alternative to traditional hierarchical structures, there were in practice several managing editors over the life-span of the magazine beginning with Volume 5, 1984. The first managing editor listed was Elizabeth Allemang until 1985. At this point, the number of managing editors begins to vary from a minimum of one to a maximum of three women at a time. Although these shifts reflect the changing lives of the women themselves, they also reflect some of the challenges faced by many feminist publications and grass-roots organizations. Many women’s organizations are mostly volunteer based, which means its collective members have other jobs as well. Furthermore, many of these groups are run by activists involved in other collectives facing similar funding and structural challenges. Often burn-out and inconsistency are the result. Although Healthsharing is no exception to this rule, they maintained a core group of women who came and went over its fifteen year life-span. In 1987, Connie Clement was effectively the managing editor. The other names which appeared regularly were Elizabeth Amer, Amyra Braha, Connie Guberman, Lisa McCaskell, Susan Elliot, Alice Grange and Diana Majury. In 1988, the editorial position was assumed by Amy Gottlieb. She remained editor for a little more than three years, until 1991, when Hazelle Palmer was introduced to the magazine for the first time. From 1991 to 1993, Hazelle Palmer was editor and member of the collective. The second last issue was released with Janet Creery as editor and for the final issue, Amy Gottlieb resumed the editorial position. Regardless of the many twists and turns in the magazine’s administrative past, they released every issue successfully save one, when they received what was to be a mortal blow, the Secretary of State funding cut in 1990.

Shufelt, Laura

  • Person
  • ca. [1890-1970]
Lived on Cartier Street in Ottawa, Ontario.
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