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Yanz, Lynda

  • Person
  • 1951-
Lynda Yanz currently is the Executive Director for Maquila Solidarity Network and President of the Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, Toronto, Canada.

Beadle, Gert

  • Person
  • 1915-2001
Gert Beadle was born in 1915 and grew up in a farming community outside of Fort Frances, Ontario where she ran the general store & post office. In 1952 she moved with her husband Ralf, to Thunder Bay, Ontario where she was a nurse and became active in the women's movement. She helped establish the Women’s Crisis Homes Incorporated, which grew to include a women’s centre, a rape crisis line, a women’s health collective, a women’s credit union, and a feminist newspaper. She was also a board member of the Thunder Bay Women's Centre and a founding member of the Northern Women's Credit Union. She was also the first president of Crisis Homes Inc. '76, an organization providing support services to battered women. In 1985 she moved to Kelowna, BC where she spent the rest of her life. Member of the collective Northern Woman's Journal, she has published many articles and two volumes of poetry and an essay: Salt and Yeast, Selected Poems (1977), Rising: selected poems (1980) and The resisting spirit (1984). The Kelowna Women’s resources Centre created the Gert Beadle Award in her memory. This award recognizes the value of invisible work done at the community level to enhance women’s equality. Gert Beadle passed away July 11, 2001 at Kelowna, BC at the age of 86.

Antoine, André

  • Person
  • 1858-1943
André Antoine est un comédien, metteur en scène, directeur de théâtre, réalisateur et critique dramatique français né le 31 janvier 1858 à Limoges et mort le 19 octobre 1943 au Pouliguen. Considéré comme l'inventeur de la mise en scène moderne en France, il a donné son nom au Théâtre Antoine à Paris.

Frize, Monique

  • Person
  • 1942-

Monique Frize, née Aubry (1942 - ), is a Canadian researcher and engineer in the biomedical field. She was the first women to study engineering at the University of Ottawa and graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science (Electrical Engineering) in 1966. She received an Athlone Fellowship and completed a Master’s in Philosophy in Electrical Engineering (Engineering in Medicine) at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London (United Kingdom), a Master’s of Business Administration at the University of Moncton (New Brunswick), and a doctorate from Erasmus Universiteit in Rotterdam (The Netherlands).

Monique Frize worked as a clinical engineer for 18 years. She started her career at the Hôpital Notre-Dame in Montreal. In 1979, she was appointed Director of the Regional Clinical Engineering Service in Moncton (New Brunswick) and became the first Chair of the Division of Clinical Engineering for the International Federation of Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) in 1985. In 1989, she was appointed the first holder of the national Northern Telecom/NSERC Chair for women in engineering at the University of New Brunswick, and professor in the Electrical department. In 1990, she was named chair of the Canadian Committee for Women in Engineering (CCWE). In 1997, she joined Carleton University, as a Professor in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, and the University of Ottawa, as a Professor in the School of Information Technology and Engineering. She also held the Ontario NSERC/Nortel Chair for women in science and engineering. She is a founding member of International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES) and was its president between 2002 and 2008. In 2007, she founded INWES Education and Research Institute (ERI) and has been its president since then.

As a biomedical engineer, Monique Frize is knowledgeable in medical instruments and decision support systems. She developed a software program to predict complications in premature babies and perfected a technique that uses an infrared camera to detect the presence of arthritis. Throughout her career, she has been active in promoting women in leadership roles in science and engineering. As a role model for women engineers, she taught, conducted research, and lead campaigns to encourage young women to pursue careers in engineering. She is the author of more than 200 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals and proceedings. She has published several books such as The Bold and the Brave: A history of women in science and engineering (2009), Laura Bassi and Science in 18th Century Europe (2013), Ethics for Bioengineers (2011), and Health Care Engineering Parts I and II (2013). She has received many honours and awards including honorary doctorates from several Canadian Universities. She was inducted as Officer of the Order of Canada in 1993.

Yaffe, Debby (Deborah)

  • Person
  • 1943-
Debby (Deborah) Yaffe is a feminist, activist and retired University of Victoria Department of Women’s Studies senior instructor. Yaffe (née Frisch) was born in 1943 and grew up in Southern California. She attended University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the 1960s. Taking her husband’s last name, Gregory, she and her husband lived in Europe with their son, moving to London in the 1970s. It was there, while working as a teacher, that Yaffe became involved in the women’s movement through her attendance at consciousness-raising group meetings. She subsequently formed her own group and took part in feminist actions. Yaffe later returned to the United States on her own and eventually settled in Victoria, British Columbia, with her family. After her divorce, she took her mother’s maiden name, Yaffe. In Victoria, she volunteered with Everywomen's Books, worked as a paid staff member for the local office of the Victoria Status of Women Action Group, from 1986 to 1988, and was involved in organizing around key issues such as abortion rights. Yaffe was approached to teach Introduction to Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 1990 and she retired in 2004. She holds a master’s degree in Women’s Studies and is a 2001 recipient of UVic Alumni Association’s award for excellence in teaching. Yaffe is one of the founders, along with former university archivist Jane Turner, of the Victoria Women’s Movement Archives at UVic Archives.

Gallagher, Dawna

  • Person
Dawna Gallagher-Moore was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She is a visual and performance artist, and also a visual researcher of Canadian cultural history. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), and a Masters of Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She has completed doctoral studies and an oral examination in Canadian History at the University of Ottawa. In 1986, she received the Brucebo Canadian-Scandinavian Scholarship for landscape painting and spent a summer painting and bicycling around Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea. She worked for Library and Archives Canada. She also has taught painting, drawing, watercolour, cartooning and art history. She is best known for her cryptic, witty, and pointed cartoons published in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Ottawa, and New-York. She now runs TreeTop Art Studio, which offers workshops and art classes for children and adults in Ottawa, Ontario. She is married to the writer and editor John P. Moore.

Overend, Valerie

  • CA
  • Person
  • 1953-

Valerie Overend was born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1953. During the 1990s, Valerie worked as a Red Seal Carpenter on commercial construction projects in the Regina area with the local Carpenters Union. Valerie had never met another woman on a construction site and knew that she wanted to do something to change that situation. She knew that women wanted to work in physical, creative, well-paying jobs but that they were limited by opportunity. She took advantage of her role as a summer instructor and moved into creating other programs for girls and women, maintaining the focus on career exploration in trades and technology. For the next 25 years, Valerie made her living expanding on that role until to her retirement.

In the 1970s, Saskatchewan Women in Trades & Technology (SaskWITT), a provincial organization that promotes and assists in the recruitment and training of girls and young women in predominantly male fields, was established. In the early 1990s, Valerie represented SaskWITT on the Board of the WITT National Network. That organization also developed programs to guide women into careers in trades and technology occupations. Valerie was on the team of WITT instructors from across Canada who met to develop National Standards and Guidelines for WITT programs in Canada. These were updated and revised again near the end of the decade to reflect changes in the landscape of trades and technology occupations. This work was fundamental in the development of curriculum resources that were introduced in all provinces and territories in Canada, many of them still in use.

In 1991, Valerie was approached by the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) to teach summer camps to introduce grades 7 and 8 girls to careers in trades and technology. With Valerie at the helm, SIAST campuses delivered summer Girls Exploring Trades and Technology Camps, GETT Alumnae workshops for high school girls, weekend Kids in the Shop Programs, a Kindergarten project where role models visited 60 classes each year, Women in Trades and Women in Technology Exploratory Programs, Career Fairs and variations of all of these for Aboriginal girls and women.

In 1995, she co-founded the Women’s Work Training Program in Regina, Saskatchewan. Throughout her career, Valerie sat on numerous Boards and Committees representing tradeswomen. These include the Saskatchewan Education Council, Saskatchewan Carpenters Trade Board, Saskatchewan Provincial Apprenticeship Board, the Saskatchewan Labour Market Initiatives Committee to the Canadian Construction Association, and the Women’s Reference Group to the Provincial Labour Force Development Board. Nationally, Valerie represented Saskatchewan as a Director of the Canadian Vocational Association, WITT NN, and CCWESTT. Through her involvement with these organizations, Valerie held Director positions with the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum and the National Women’s Reference Group on Labour Market Initiatives.

Aside from working directly with girls and women, Valerie began to work with employers and unions to resolve some of the barriers that conspired to keep women out of jobs in various industries. She worked both as a private consultant and as a consultant with WITT NN on various Employment Equity and Retention projects throughout the decade. Valerie’s work often involved travel, primarily in Canada. Over time, Valerie worked not only with the Construction Industry but also with Oil and Gas, and Mining Industries. She had contracts in Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories, and all of the Western Provinces and Ontario. As well, Valerie’s work once took her to Malawi in Africa.

When WITT NN dissolved in the early 2000s, Valerie was invited to work as a consultant to a project by the Canadian Coalition of Women in Science, Engineering, Trades and Technology (CCWESTT). This resulted in the formation of the WinSETT Centre, a mechanism established to expand and support women’s participation in Science, Engineering, Trades and Technology. Valerie became the Trades Consultant for the organization and worked to establish a pan-Canadian presence among unions, employers, and employer associations through delivery of programs and services.

Valerie has received both local and national recognition for her work. In 1992, she was awarded the Governor General’s 125 Medal for community volunteerism and she also recognized by the YWCA Regina as a Woman of Distinction. In 2005, Valerie received the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal. These awards recognize her dedicated work as a role model inspiring young women in non-traditional fields.

Shepherd, Elizabeth

  • CA
  • Person
  • 1936-

Elizabeth Shepherd was born in London, England on 12 August, 1936. Her parents were Methodist missionaries in Burma where she spent her early childhood. She began her career as an actor in England before moving to Canada in 1972 to appear at the Stratford Festival Theatre. She has worked extensively there, as well as in the United States and in England, performing in theatre, movies and television. She teaches Shakespeare and the English classics and has held seminars/workshops at the Stratford and Shaw Festivals.

Elizabeth had been interested in women’s issues through Voice of Women for Peace but became more actively involved when she was inspired by Michele Landsberg’s description of the Women’s Action Coalition in the US. When it was decided to start a similar action in Canada, she became an enthusiastic member and was active throughout the 1990s. She was also involved in women’s organisations like METRAC, which raised awareness of violence against women, and has a special interest in women and the legal justice system. Elizabeth resides in New York. She has a son, Edmund Boys.

Brooks, Toby

  • Person
  • 1936-
Toby Brooks trained as a social worker and moved from U.S. to Ottawa in 1970 along with her husband, David Brooks. She was a staff member of the Ottawa Interval House, an early transition house for battered women in the 1970s and 1980s. She was involved in the Ontario Association of Interval and Transition Houses during the 1980s. She wrote a book about the poet Pat Lowther entitled "Pat Lowther's continent : her life and work" that was published in 2000.

Bennett, Judith

  • Person
  • 1951-
Judith MacKenzie Bennett is an American historian and professor emerita of History at the University of Southern California. She holds the John R. Hubbard Chair in British History. She is specialized in medieval Europe History, focusing on gender, women's history and rural peasants. She studied at the University of Toronto for her Ph.D. in Medieval Studies. She graduated in 1981.
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