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Hansson, Carolyn

  • Person
  • 1941-
Born in Hazel Grove, Cheshire, England, she obtained a B. SC Engineering in 1961 and a PH.D. in Physical Metallurgy in 1966 from the Imperial College, London University. She was the first female student in the Royal School of Mines at Imperial College and the first woman to graduate with a PH.D. in metallurgy.

Grenier, Cécile

  • Person
  • 1907-2013

Pédagogue et pionnière en enseignement de l'éducation physique au Québec, Cécile Grenier naît à Montréal (Québec) le 12 juin 1907. Récipiendaire d’un diplôme de l’École normale de Nicolet en 1925, elle quitte le Québec pour enseigner la littérature française au Lorette College (Toronto, Ontario). Deux ans plus tard, elle revient à Montréal (Québec) où elle est engagée par la Commission des écoles catholique de Montréal (CECM) ou elle est notamment en charge de l’éducation physique. Afin de mieux connaitre cette matière, elle fait de la recherche et, à partir de 1962, elle suit des cours d’éducation physique et obtient un certificat de la Fondation Strathcona. Dix ans plus tard (1937), elle devient assistante-directrice du Service de l’éducation physique à la CECM, poste lui permettant d’organiser un curriculum pour l’éducation physique des filles. Grâce à une bourse d’étude, Cécile Grenier étudie la gymnastique en Suède. Elle fonde également l’Institut d’éducation physique, une institution dispensant de formations poussée en enseignement de l’éducation physique pour filles au niveau primaire et secondaire. Dans les années 1940, elle s'intéresse à diverses nouvelles méthodes d'enseignement dont la méthode Medeau, créée par Senta et Henrich Medeau, avec qui elle suit un stage en 1962.

Le travail de Cécile Grenier ne se borne pas à la CECM et à l’Institut d’éducation physique. En 1948, elle est choisie par le Département de l’instruction publique de l’Université de Montréal pour mettre sur pied un nouveau programme d’enseignement d’éducation physique pour filles de la première à la huitième année. Elle enseigne l’expression corporelle au Conservatoire d’art dramatique (1955-1960) et la gymnastique analytique à l’Université de Montréal (1956-1958). Cécile Grenier est décédée à Montréal en décembre 2003.

Fulford, Margaret

  • Person
  • 1960-
Margaret Fulford worked at Canadian Women's Movement Archives, the Music Library of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Toronto Reference Library, and the Canadian Health Network. She edited The Canadian Women’s Movement, 1960-1990: A Guide to Archival Resources (1992). She co-developed the subject thesaurus of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (2001). She was Faculty Librarian at U of T’s Dental Library and currently is the University College Librarian at the University of Toronto.

Donaldson, E. Lisbeth

  • Person
Ethel Lisbeth (Betty) Donaldson is a professor of education and director of teaching and learning curriculum projects at the University of Calgary.

Kellerman, Maureen

  • Person
  • 1957-2012
Maureen Elizabeth Kellerman completed a BA in Canadian Studies at Carleton University and devoted her life to supporting young families at the local and national levels. She worked for Canadian Association of Family Resource Centres, and Canadian/Military Family Resource Centres. Educator, activist, and leader, Maureen founded Mothers Are Women (MAW) in 1984, and was a key organizer for the legalization of midwifery in Ontario during the 1990s.

Turner, Joan

  • Person
Joan Turner was an associate professor at the University of Manitoba’s School of Social Work for almost 20 years and also had a private practice that included counselling, therapeutic massage and body work. Upon receiving an inheritance from an aunt who had always supported women’s issues, Joan decided to open a women’s bookstore in her memory. The Bold Print bookstore located in Winnipeg, Manitoba was in operation from 1986 until 1994. Turner edited Living the Changes and co-edited Perspectives on Women (originally titled “in the 80’s”; and Spider Women: A Tapestry of Healing and Creativity.

Crone, Emma Joy

  • Person
  • 1928-
Emma Joy Reeves was born in January 1928 in Manchester, England, to a working class family. From 1943 to 1945 she received secretarial and business training from the College of Commerce in Manchester. For more than 30 years, she worked as a medical secretary in different doctors' offices. From 1957 to 1961, she trained as a Hospital Welfare Worker and then became a Geriatric Social Worker. In 1965, following a divorce after 12 years of marriage, she moved to Germany and in 1968 emigrated to New York. A year later, Joy Reeves moved to San Francisco and became involved in the feminist movement. Joy Reeves had been involved with her former husband in the protest against Nuclear Warfare since the end of the Second World War. In 1973, she moved to Vancouver, British Columbia. In Canada, she is better known under the pen name Emma Joy Crone, a feminist writer and lesbian. She published “The common woman” in August 2005. She has also published articles and poetry in many magazines such as Herspectives.

Freeman, Barbara M.

  • Person
Barbara M. Freeman holds a Bachelor of Journalism degree and a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She graduated with a Ph.D. in History from Concordia University in Montreal. She began teaching at Carleton University in Ottawa in 1980 after a career in broadcast journalism. As an adjunct research professor of journalism at Carleton University, her key research areas were communications history, and gender and diversity issues in the media in the School of Journalism and Communication. She is the author of Beyond Bylines: Media Workers and Women’s Rights in Canada (2011), The Satellite Sex: The Media and Women’s Issues in English Canada, 1966-1971 (2001), and of Kit’s Kingdom: the Journalism of Kathleen Blake Colema (1989). In these essays, she examines historical cases of women who worked in print and broadcast media and were committed activists as well. Her case studies illustrate how the language and foci of women’s rights have changed from the late 19th century until the year 2000 as her subjects sought equality in education, suffrage, fair employment practices, reproductive and sexual freedom, and the rights of indigenous women. She has also published articles in several anthologies and journals. She is a founding and executive member of the Media and Communication History Committee and a member of the Canadian Committee on Women’s History.
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