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Nemiroff, Greta Hofmann

  • Persoon
  • 1937-
Greta Hofmann Nemiroff is a writer, educator, and coordinator of Women’s Studies programs. She was born in 1937 in Montreal to parents who had emigrated from Vienna, Austria to Canada in 1930. She studied at McGill University and graduated in 1958. In 1970 to 1971, Greta Nemiroff and Christine Allen Garside taught a course entitled: “The Nature of Woman: Historic Attitudes and Recent Approaches” at Sir George Williams University (a predecessor to Concordia University) in the Philosophy Department. Nemiroff began teaching at the New School at Dawson College in 1973. She taught English and Humanities and intermittently directed and co-coordinated the New School. She held this post until 1991.
Nemiroff was president of the Sisterhood is Global Institute (SIGI), an international non-governmental organization, when it moved to Montreal. In 1979, with the help of students and the Simone de Beauvoir Institute community members, she edited the first Simone de Beauvoir Institute Bulletin.
At the end of the 1980s, Greta Nemiroff was a project manager at the Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women (CCLOW). She was president-elect at the Canadian Women Studies Association (CWSA) for the year 1991-1992. Between 1991 and 1996, she chaired the joint Women’s Studies program at Ottawa University and Carleton University.

Bazilli, Susan

  • Persoon
Susan Bazilli is a lawyer, author, educator, social entrepreneur and advocate, who has worked globally on issues of women's rights for more than 30 years. A graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School (LL.B.) and UBC (LL.M.), she lived and worked in South Africa from 1985-1991, and is the editor of the groundbreaking text "Putting Women on the Agenda: Women, Law and the Constitution in Southern Africa". From 1992 - 1997, she was the Legal Director of METRAC, The Metropolitan Committee on Violence Against Women in Toronto, Canada, and founded the Internet-based Ontario Women's Justice Network. In 1997 she became the first Executive Director of the California Alliance Against Domestic Violence. From 2003-2007, Susan was the Co-Director with Marilou McPhedran for the non-profit organization the International Women's Rights Project (IWRP) based in Vancouver, BC. Susan went on to become sole Director of IWRP from 2007 onwards (Susan is the Director at the time of writing in 2021). IWRP advocates for women’s human rights, strengthens Women’s NGOs in Canada and around the world, and encourages implementation of international human rights standards through collaboration, participatory research, and evidence-based advocacy on a project-by-project basis. In 2010 Susan was the Executive Producer and Writer for the documentary film Constitute!, a project of IWRP which documents women's constitutional activism for the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Sections 15 and 18) on February 14th, 1981. Susan's international missions have included many UN missions and assignments on peace building, rule of law, gender based violence, sustainable development, international trans-boundary waters, gender mainstreaming within the Global Environment Facility, and gender equality laws in Mongolia and, South East Asia; women's human rights training in Bosnia, Lithuania and East Africa for Women Law and Development International; bilateral missions in Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan for the OSCE; trainings in ICTs for development in the Baltic and Balkan regions for USAID and CIDA; evaluating the use of CEDAW by grassroots NGOs; managing the gender program for the American Bar Association - CEELI Program in Russia; developing and coordinating a seven country Southern African Women's Legal Rights program. D).

Quinlan, Judith

  • Persoon

Judith Quinlan is a graduate of the University of Alberta in Edmonton and was on the Student Council (1970) and was part of starting the first Edmonton Women's Centre and the Isis women's shelter while a student. After graduating, she moved to Vancouver and worked on the Pedestal Women's Newspaper. In 1972, she moved to Toronto and worked on The Other Woman newspaper, helped start the Toronto Women's Bookstore, was one of the founders of Cora the Women's Bookmobile, and the Toronto Women's Centre. Judith later wrote for Broadside and worked on the LOOT project. She started the All Girls Hit and Run Feminist Marching Band and joined the Wages for Housework group and started Wages Due Lesbians.

After stepping away from these groups, she wrote poetry and songs (including the Mama Quilla name song) and then moved to rural British Columbia, where she worked with the 100 Mile House Women's Centre, acted as the editor of The Open Door (Rural Lesbians of BC), and got involved in choirs and music teaching. She later moved back to Vancouver and then Victoria where she currently resides.

Helen Fallding

  • Persoon
Helen Fallding is an activist for human rights, gay and lesbian rights. She is a journalist. She was the first coordinator of the women's centre at the University of Toronto. She also coordinated the Women's Centre in Victoria, B..C.. She helped the Carcross-Tagish First Nation to negociate a land claim. She co-founded Yukon's first organization and was founding manager of the University of Manitoba Centre for Human Rights Research. She worked as a journalist for the Northern Native Broadcasting Yukon and Winnipeg Free Press. She won awards for feminist activism and for journalism.

Voice of Women

  • Instelling
  • 1960-

Voice of Women began in 1960 when women across Canada were alarmed about the threat of nuclear war and how nuclear testing was endangering their children’s lives. Lotta Dempsey wrote columns in the Toronto Star asking women to write to her if they were willing to “do something” about this imminent danger. Hundreds replied. Four women, Jo Davis, Dorothy Henderson, Helen Tucker and Beth Touzel met with Lotta Dempsey and shortly thereafter “The Voice of Women” was established. Within months, thousands of women joined VOW that began to receive newsletters urging women to form small local groups to keep in touch with one another and to encourage all their female friends to join and unite for world peace.

Canadian Voice of Women for Peace (VOW) is a non-partisan Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) comprised of a network of diverse women with consultative status at the United Nations ECOSOC. For 55 years, VOW has tirelessly advocated for a world without war. An accredited NGO to the United Nations, affiliated to the Department of Public Information (DPI) and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), VOW was the Canadian lead group for peace at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. Members have been active in follow-up activities, including writing the chapter,”Women and Peace” in Take Action for Equality, Development and Peace.

They continue to exist today as part of a growing and select number of NGOs that provide women the opportunity to appeal to national government and international diplomats, attend conferences at the United Nations including the UN Commission on the Status of Women, and to write and present briefs and statements to political heads of state and nations worldwide on women and peace issues. They respond to calls for guidance and research on peace and women’s issues locally, nationally, and internationally. VOW is a non-partisan, non-religious organization that values women in all their diversities.

Mothers Are Women

  • Instelling
  • 1984-1995
Mothers Are Women (MAW) was a national, Ottawa-based feminist organization established in September 1984 by Maureen Kellerman, as a special project of the Parent Preschool Resource Centre. It evolved into an independent and volunteer-run organization, partially funded by Secretary of State funding. MAW members respected all childcare choices but they were especially concerned with the interests of women who chose to stay at home with their children. They identified that this choice was undervalued by society at the time so they offered personal support as well as lobbying for greater recognition of stay at home mothers. They had support groups, a telephone helpline (the MAW line), workshops, and circulated a publication called Homebase. At their height, they had 450 members representing every province and territory of Canada.

Healthsharing

  • Instelling
  • 1978-1993

Healthsharing was a Toronto-based publication concerned with examining women’s health issues and alternatives to mainstream health care from a feminist viewpoint and it has been called “Canada’s first women’s health magazine”. The Healthsharing Collective was comprised, for the most part, of volunteer labour and regularly a minimum of two paid staff members. It was officially incorporated in 1978 and published quarterly between 1979 and 1993. It is clear from the collection of letters which flowed into the Healthsharing Collective office on a regular basis that the magazine was well received and was an integral part of women’s health activism during the fourteen years of its existence. Although the first years of publication ran smoothly, it soon became increasingly difficult for the magazine to survive and much of the energy of the collective was spent not only on maintaining and improving the magazine, but also on advertising and soliciting funding from government and other agencies. In 1990, the Conservative government cut the Secretary of State’s Woman’s Program and this hit Healthsharing hard. Although the magazine managed to survive for three more years thanks to donations from supporters, subscription renewals and a transfer of $344,000 in grant funds originally intended for a regional women’s health network, they published the last issue in fall 1993.

The administrative records are incomplete and run from 1984 to 1993 and largely reflect the beginning of the Collective. Despite Secretary of State funding in the mid-1980s, pressure to obtain more funding for expansion was crucial. While the notion of expansion was clearly an exciting one, their concepts and methods of collective organizing based on devoted volunteer efforts made obtaining stable funding difficult. The collective continued for many years in this way, at times successfully soliciting additional funds for special issues through Health and Welfare and Employment and Immigration work programs. In this way, they were occasionally able to pay extra staff.

Although the magazine was run through a collective editorial board in order to create a feminist alternative to traditional hierarchical structures, there were in practice several managing editors over the life-span of the magazine beginning with Volume 5, 1984. The first managing editor listed was Elizabeth Allemang until 1985. At this point, the number of managing editors begins to vary from a minimum of one to a maximum of three women at a time. Although these shifts reflect the changing lives of the women themselves, they also reflect some of the challenges faced by many feminist publications and grass-roots organizations. Many women’s organizations are mostly volunteer based, which means its collective members have other jobs as well. Furthermore, many of these groups are run by activists involved in other collectives facing similar funding and structural challenges. Often burn-out and inconsistency are the result. Although Healthsharing is no exception to this rule, they maintained a core group of women who came and went over its fifteen year life-span. In 1987, Connie Clement was effectively the managing editor. The other names which appeared regularly were Elizabeth Amer, Amyra Braha, Connie Guberman, Lisa McCaskell, Susan Elliot, Alice Grange and Diana Majury. In 1988, the editorial position was assumed by Amy Gottlieb. She remained editor for a little more than three years, until 1991, when Hazelle Palmer was introduced to the magazine for the first time. From 1991 to 1993, Hazelle Palmer was editor and member of the collective. The second last issue was released with Janet Creery as editor and for the final issue, Amy Gottlieb resumed the editorial position. Regardless of the many twists and turns in the magazine’s administrative past, they released every issue successfully save one, when they received what was to be a mortal blow, the Secretary of State funding cut in 1990.

Sexual Assault Centre of Brant

  • Instelling
  • 1993-
In 1988 a group of women who sought to provide support to victims of sexual assault at the community level came together to form the Brant Sexual Assault Awareness Committee. They aimed to increase any services that existed for sexual assault victims; educate Brant County residents regarding the extent of sexual assault, and to advocate for the development of local services. In 1990, funding from the Ontario Women's Directorate and Secretary of State enabled a survey to be carried out, the results of which overwhelmingly called for sexual assault services to be established. In 1991 under the NDP government the Sexual Assault Centre of Brant was formed and it continues to offer this support today to women in Brant County who are survivors of sexual violence and to the people who support these survivors. They offer individual and group counselling, public education, advocacy, resources, and accompaniments to the court, police, or hospital. All of their services are open to women 16 and over in Brant County. The crisis line is open to survivors of sexual violence (female or male) or a friend or family member of someone who has experienced sexual violence.
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