Mostrando 147 resultados

Registro de autoridad

Nellie Langford Rowell Library collection

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1969-
The Nellie Langford Rowell Library began its existence in 1969 with the collections of documents by the radical feminist group Toronto New Feminists. This group disbanded in 1973 and its library collection was moved the Women's Place on Dupont Street in Toronto. Afterwards, the collection was handed over to the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Metropolitan Toronto on Birth Street.
Upon Birch Street's Y's closure, the documents were put in storage. Joanna Stuckley, the library's first organizer, a faculty member and an advisor to the President on the Status of Women at York's University, was able to arrange for the library to be moved to York University as the York-YWCA Collection. York University has provided a budget to cover one third of its library expenses. In 1985, 1987 and 1994, a donation by Mary Coyne Rowell, through the Jackman Foundation, enabled Founder's College to establish the library on a permanent basis. The library was renamed to honour Mary Coyne Rowell Jackman's mother, Nellie Langford Rowell.

Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ottawa (BWCPO)

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1933-

The Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario (BPWCO) was formed as a provincial wing of the Canadian Business and Professional Women's Clubs, itself a charter member of the International Federation. In 1933, the Business and Professional Women's Club of Ottawa (BPWCO), a local branch of the Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario, was created. Membership to a local Business and Professional Women's Club allowed access to provincial, national and international membership.

In 1948, the Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario (BPWCO) had its first annual provincial conference. It was headed by a board of directors who met before and after the annual meeting. An interim board meeting was held in the fall and the executive began to meet on a more regular basis. In Ontario, the local clubs were grouped in 12 regions, each comprising of a maximum of 12 clubs. Each individual club elected a regional advisor among its membership. Regional advisors acted as a liaison between the board of directors and other clubs, visited the clubs yearly, and encouraged the creation of additional clubs.

In 1970, the Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario (BPWCO) went through a reorganization. Regions were disbanded and the number of districts was increased from four to seven. Changes were also added to the Board of Directors. The number of vice-presidents decreased from four to one and seven district directors were appointed.

The Business and Professional Women's Club of Ottawa and Business and Professional Women's Clubs of Ontario hosted various activities such as contests for career women and Business Women's Week. Both organizations were also involved in lobbying, the creation of scholarships, as well as the presentation of briefs and submissions to government commissions and the United Nations.

The objects of all clubs were quite similar: to encourage equal status for women in economic, civil and political life; to promote the interests of business and professional women; to encourage education and occupational training for girls and women; and to promote cooperation between professional and business women.

Redlight Theatre

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1974-1977

The Redlight Theatre was Toronto’s first professional feminist theatre company, operating from 1974 to 1977. Diane Grant, Marcella Lustig, and Francine Volker, who were actors and playwrights in Toronto’s alternative theatre scene, founded Redlight Theatre to give women artistic, technical and administrative opportunities in theatre. Grant, Lustig, and Volker served as Co-Artistic Directors and the theatre was run by a combination of hired staff and volunteers.

The Redlight Theatre mounted a wide range of productions addressing feminist topics such as the women’s history, gender stereotyping, and abortion. It produced original plays and commissioned work from playwrights such as Carol Bold and Margaret Hollingsworth. The Redlight Theatre’s most acclaimed production was What Glorious Times We Had written by Diane Grant, which told the story of Nellie McClung and the suffrage movement in Manitoba. What Glorious Times We Had premiered in 1974 and toured Canada for International Women’s Year in 1975. Other notable productions include Entrances (1974) written by Marcella Lustig and Francine Volker, Strange Games (1975) by Elinore Siminovitch, and Queen of the Silver Blades (1976) by Susan Swan and Margaret Dragu. The Redlight Theatre also sponsored Cleo Laine’s first concert in Canada.

In 1975, Redlight Theatre created the Playwrights Workshop to encourage women to develop professional skills in writing for the theatre. Plays that emerged from this workshop include Inside Looking In by Joann MacIntyre, Lies My Mother Told Me by Gay Claitman and Nancy White, and 10,000 Hellcats in Deepfreeze by Suzette Couture, Marcella Lustig, and Jacqueline Swartz.

Established with a grant from the Local Initiatives Program, the Redlight Theatre also received funding from The Secretary of State, the Canada Council, and the City of Toronto. The theatre never acquired sufficient funds to secure a permanent location so productions were staged in various venues, including the Matador Club, the Bathurst Street United Church, the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse, and St. Paul’s Centre. After three seasons, the Redlight Theatre closed due to lack of funding in 1977.

Dwight-Spore, Margaret

  • Persona

Margaret Dwight-Spore was born in the United States but moved in Canada with her husband in 1971. In 1977, she founded Better End All Vicious Erotic Repression (B.E.A.V.E.R), an organization dedicated to decriminalizing prostitution in Canada. Around 1979 BEAVER changed its name to Committee Against Street Harassment (CASH). It offered legal advice, counselling, referrals and support to sex workers and also provided education through public discussion. It was disbanded in the early 1980s. The prostitute's resource office, "Maggie's" founded by sex-workers in the 1980s was name for Dwight-Spore.

Margaret Dwight-Spore also participated in various workshops and conferences. She was the leader of a University of Concordia seminar on prostitution and pornography, a Conference on Human Sexuality and Freedom workshop leader and a National Action Committee on the Status of Women (NAC) conference prostitution workshop panel participant. In addition to her involvement in conferences and activities, she also worked as a resource person at the Toronto Rape Crisis Centre and the Elizabeth Fry Society and she the focus of an interview published in Fireweed in 1978. In 1985, Margaret Dwight-Spore returned to the United States.

Canadian Labour Congress (CLC)

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1956-
The Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) is a national trade union centre, the central labour body in English Canada to which most Canadian labour unions are affiliated. It was founded on April 23, 1956 through the merger of the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada and the Canadian Congress of Labour.

Lenskyj, Helen

  • Persona
  • 1979-[2000]

Helen Jefferson Lenskyj was born in Sydeny, Australia and moved to Toronto, Canada 1966. From 1972 to 1983, she completed her BA, MA, and Ph.D. at the University of Toronto. In 1986, she began teaching part-time at the University of Toronto. In 1990, she was appointed Associate Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (O.I.S.E.), at the University of Toronto. Between 1986 and 2007, she was Professor of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. She was also involved with the Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE) at the University, mostly with the subcommittee that she coordinated, which investigated a free-standing women’s studies program.

Helen is currently Professor Emerita of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Since the 1970s, she has been involved in several community activist groups, including the Feminist Party of Canada (F.P.C.). She continues to work as a researcher, writer, public speaker and community activist. She has published books and numerous book chapters, journal and magazine articles on women, sport, sexuality, and the Olympic industry.

Clough, Annette

  • Persona
  • 1941-
Photographer Annette was born in Jamaica in 1941 and emigrated to Canada in 1960s where she attended Ontario College of Art and University of Toronto. In the 1970s she was involved with the Women’s Counselling Referral and Education Centre, and with Women Against Nuclear Technology in Toronto. Later in the 1980s, she lived in Vancouver, and worked for the Vancouver Women’s Health Collective. She was also a member of the Lavender Conception Conspiracy, a group of lesbians planning to have babies. In the 1990s, she moved back to Toronto and worked for the Women’s Counselling Referral and Education Centre.
Annette Clough is no longer active in any women’s groups.

Committee Against Street Harassment (CASH)

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1979-[1985]
In 1977, Margaret Dwight-Spore founded Better End All Vicious Erotic Repression (B.E.A.V.E.R), an organization dedicated to decriminalizing prostitution in Canada. Around 1979 BEAVER changed its name to Committee Against Street Harassment (CASH). It offered legal advice, counselling, referrals and support to sex workers and also provided education through public discussion. It was disbanded in the early 1980s.

Matisko family

  • Familia
  • 1902-
Ján (John) Matisko was born in 1902 in Slovakia. According to a letter written by one of his former students, he was a teacher in Prešov, a city in eastern Slovakia. He and his wife Martha had a son named Barney. According to his correspondence, he may have arrived in the United States in 1949 and settled in New Kensington, Pennsylvania. He passed away in 1974.

Billings, Rosemary

  • Persona
Rosemary Billings was an activist and lobbyist who worked as an executive member of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women and the Ad Hoc Committee of Canadian Women on the Constitution, which fought for inclusion of Section 28 in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms – ensuring the recognition of the equality of women and men. Rosemary Billings was also a Federal Government employee, retiring in 2003. She lives in Ottawa, Ontario.
Resultados 61 a 70 de 147