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Yaffe, Debby (Deborah)

  • Persoon
  • 1943-
Debby (Deborah) Yaffe is a feminist, activist and retired University of Victoria Department of Women’s Studies senior instructor. Yaffe (née Frisch) was born in 1943 and grew up in Southern California. She attended University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the 1960s. Taking her husband’s last name, Gregory, she and her husband lived in Europe with their son, moving to London in the 1970s. It was there, while working as a teacher, that Yaffe became involved in the women’s movement through her attendance at consciousness-raising group meetings. She subsequently formed her own group and took part in feminist actions. Yaffe later returned to the United States on her own and eventually settled in Victoria, British Columbia, with her family. After her divorce, she took her mother’s maiden name, Yaffe. In Victoria, she volunteered with Everywomen's Books, worked as a paid staff member for the local office of the Victoria Status of Women Action Group, from 1986 to 1988, and was involved in organizing around key issues such as abortion rights. Yaffe was approached to teach Introduction to Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 1990 and she retired in 2004. She holds a master’s degree in Women’s Studies and is a 2001 recipient of UVic Alumni Association’s award for excellence in teaching. Yaffe is one of the founders, along with former university archivist Jane Turner, of the Victoria Women’s Movement Archives at UVic Archives.

Gellman, Steven

  • Persoon
  • 1947-
Steven Gellman is a Canadian composer, pianist, and former professor of composition and theory at the University of Ottawa. Gellman was born in Toronto (1947) where he began studying piano and composition at an early age under the instruction of Dr. Samuel Dolin. He appeared frequently as a pianist and composer throughout his teens. At the age of 16, he appeared as a soloist with the CBC Symphony Orchestra in a performance of his own composition Concerto for Piano and Orchestra. Gellman won the International BMI award in 1964, making him the first Canadian to be awarded the accolade.
Gellman studied at Juilliard in New York City under Vincent Persichetti, Luciano Berio and Roger Sessions from 1965 to 1968. He attended the Aspen Music Festival and School during the summers of 1965 and 1966 as a student of Darius Milhaud. In 1973, Gellman entered the Paris Conservatory where he studied with Olivier Messiaen from 1973 to 1976. During his time at the Conservatory, Gellman was awarded the Premier Prix. In 1970, Gellman’s piece Mythos for flute and string quartet won the UNESCO prize for the best work by a composer under the age of 25. In 1975, Gellman’s work Chori was premiered by the Toronto Symphony.
Gellman returned to Canada in 1976 and began teaching composition and theory at the University of Ottawa. He composed several pieces in the late 70s, notably Poème for Angela Hewitt; Wind Music, commissioned by the Canadian Brass; and Deux Tapisseries, commissioned by the French Government in honor of Olivier Messiaen’s 70th birthday in 1978.
Gellman received two commission from the Toronto Symphony in the 80s. The overture Awakening was premiered in 1983, and was featured during Toronto Symphony’s European tour of 1983. The second commission resulted in a five movement work for orchestra featuring the synthesizers of the Canadian Electronic Ensemble as soloists. The work was premiered in 1986, and was performed throughout Canada. Shortly after, Gellman received a commission from Jon Kimura Parker, which led to the composition Keyboard Triptych for Piano and Synthesizer. Gellman was named the Canada Council Composer of the Year in 1987.
Gellman became an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa in 1984 and was promoted to Full Professor in 1994. While teaching, Gellman continued to compose many works that have been performed throughout Canada and internationally, by ensembles such as the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Musica Camerata, Société de musique contemporaine du Québec (SMCQ), the Ottawa Symphony, and the Gryphon Trio. Gellman retired from his position at the University of Ottawa in 2011 as Professor Emeritus. His most recent work was completed in 2014.
Prior to his position at the University, Gellman travelled extensively throughout the world. In addition to his studies abroad, he spent time in places such as New Zealand, the Middle East, Greece, India, South Africa, Morocco, and Europe. In his early 20s, Gellman married Cheryl, a visual artist, with whom he had two children, Dana and Misha. Gellman remains a resident of Ottawa.

Bray, Arthur

  • Persoon
  • 1925-
Arthur Bray, who was born in Ottawa and graduated from Lisgar Collegiate, began his flying career as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II, later transferring to the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. He was serving as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1947 when there were frequent reports of Flying Saucers, later to become known as Unidentified Flying Objects or UFOs. He became curious about these reports, wondering what strange things may be flying about the same sky he was. The more he read, the more interested he became, and the study became his hobby, and, eventually, an avocation. This study inevitably resulted in the accumulation of a large collection of research material over the period to 1993. He completed his first book, Science, the Public and the UFO, (Bray Book Service, Ottawa) in 1967. It was written, after twenty years of research, as a challenge to the U.S. Air Force.
He frequently appeared on radio and TV, was a guest speaker at many meetings of clubs and associations, including, on occasion, sharing the podium with noted scientists. He also presented papers to international UFO conferences and taught a course on Ufology at Algonquin College in Ottawa. Articles about Bray and his work appeared in newspapers across Canada as well as in the U.S.A. In 1967 he was awarded the Centennial Medal in recognition of his service to Canada in the Navy.
In 1968, he began a lengthy correspondence with U. Thant, Secretary-General of the United Nations, and with the UN Outer Space Affairs Division, to get the UN to set up a full-time study of UFOs. Eventually, after supporting a proposal by the Prime Minister of Grenada, the UN asked all member nations to conduct UFO investigations on a national level and report back to the UN. Bray asked Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau to support this action, but nothing came of it.
Then in 1969, he presented a detailed outline of the UFO problem, in the form of a brief, to The Senate Committee on Science Policy, titled Science, Society and the UFO (The Queen’s Printer, Ottawa). In addition to numerous articles in UFO research journals and magazines, he contributed four articles to the Encyclopaedia of UFOs, (Doubleday & Co. Inc., Garden City, N.Y. 1980). In 1979, he wrote his second book, The UFO Connection, (Jupiter Publishing, Ottawa, 1979).
Bray, through his published work, gradually became recognized around the world as a thorough researcher. One of the leading UFO investigative organizations, the Aerial Phenomena Research Organization (APRO) based in the U.S.A., described Bray as “... one of the most respected UFO investigator - researchers in the world...”. (The APRO Bulletin, vol. 31, no. 2, January 1983).
To keep current on scientific and technical matters, he held membership in various organizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The New York Academy of Sciences, the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, and The Society of American Military Engineers. The Society of Technical Writers and Publishers and the academy of Independent Scholars also admitted him in membership based on his writing and research abilities.
Through a thorough and detailed study of the evidence, Bray became convinced of the reality of UFOs in that something which remains unidentified is intruding into our airspace. After thorough investigation, only about ten percent of reported sightings remain unidentified. The remaining ninety percent can be identified as man-made objects, known natural phenomenon or hoaxes. It is the ten percent that are the true UFOs, the others being IFOs (Identified Flying Objects). The answers to the questions of what these objects are and where they come from remain unknown to the world in general. Bray, however, is convinced that many governments have the answers, and these remain under top-secret wraps for whatever reasons. He, as well as other researchers, have discovered and published much proof of this secrecy.
When he retired from the Navy in 1971, Bray embarked on a second career as a manager with the Canada Safety Council, a non-government, non-profit organization. He retired from the Council in 1987 in the position of Director of Corporate Affairs. Since then, he continued researching and writing, but also in a new field, financial planning, and has two books published on that topic by the largest financial publishing house in Canada. He is now engaged on another major project of research and writing unrelated to his previous topic areas.
Bray retired from active UFO research after forty-six years of thorough study because no amount of private research had produced any final answers due to the cover-up, which continues, and he had other interests to pursue which had been set aside for many years due to his active involvement in Ufology.

Nemiroff, Greta Hofmann

  • Persoon
  • 1937-
Greta Hofmann Nemiroff is a writer, educator, and coordinator of Women’s Studies programs. She was born in 1937 in Montreal to parents who had emigrated from Vienna, Austria to Canada in 1930. She studied at McGill University and graduated in 1958. In 1970 to 1971, Greta Nemiroff and Christine Allen Garside taught a course entitled: “The Nature of Woman: Historic Attitudes and Recent Approaches” at Sir George Williams University (a predecessor to Concordia University) in the Philosophy Department. Nemiroff began teaching at the New School at Dawson College in 1973. She taught English and Humanities and intermittently directed and co-coordinated the New School. She held this post until 1991.
Nemiroff was president of the Sisterhood is Global Institute (SIGI), an international non-governmental organization, when it moved to Montreal. In 1979, with the help of students and the Simone de Beauvoir Institute community members, she edited the first Simone de Beauvoir Institute Bulletin.
At the end of the 1980s, Greta Nemiroff was a project manager at the Canadian Congress for Learning Opportunities for Women (CCLOW). She was president-elect at the Canadian Women Studies Association (CWSA) for the year 1991-1992. Between 1991 and 1996, she chaired the joint Women’s Studies program at Ottawa University and Carleton University.

Bazilli, Susan

  • Persoon
Susan Bazilli is a lawyer, author, educator, social entrepreneur and advocate, who has worked globally on issues of women's rights for more than 30 years. A graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School (LL.B.) and UBC (LL.M.), she lived and worked in South Africa from 1985-1991, and is the editor of the groundbreaking text "Putting Women on the Agenda: Women, Law and the Constitution in Southern Africa". From 1992 - 1997, she was the Legal Director of METRAC, The Metropolitan Committee on Violence Against Women in Toronto, Canada, and founded the Internet-based Ontario Women's Justice Network. In 1997 she became the first Executive Director of the California Alliance Against Domestic Violence. From 2003-2007, Susan was the Co-Director with Marilou McPhedran for the non-profit organization the International Women's Rights Project (IWRP) based in Vancouver, BC. Susan went on to become sole Director of IWRP from 2007 onwards (Susan is the Director at the time of writing in 2021). IWRP advocates for women’s human rights, strengthens Women’s NGOs in Canada and around the world, and encourages implementation of international human rights standards through collaboration, participatory research, and evidence-based advocacy on a project-by-project basis. In 2010 Susan was the Executive Producer and Writer for the documentary film Constitute!, a project of IWRP which documents women's constitutional activism for the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Sections 15 and 18) on February 14th, 1981. Susan's international missions have included many UN missions and assignments on peace building, rule of law, gender based violence, sustainable development, international trans-boundary waters, gender mainstreaming within the Global Environment Facility, and gender equality laws in Mongolia and, South East Asia; women's human rights training in Bosnia, Lithuania and East Africa for Women Law and Development International; bilateral missions in Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan for the OSCE; trainings in ICTs for development in the Baltic and Balkan regions for USAID and CIDA; evaluating the use of CEDAW by grassroots NGOs; managing the gender program for the American Bar Association - CEELI Program in Russia; developing and coordinating a seven country Southern African Women's Legal Rights program. D).

Quinlan, Judith

  • Persoon

Judith Quinlan is a graduate of the University of Alberta in Edmonton and was on the Student Council (1970) and was part of starting the first Edmonton Women's Centre and the Isis women's shelter while a student. After graduating, she moved to Vancouver and worked on the Pedestal Women's Newspaper. In 1972, she moved to Toronto and worked on The Other Woman newspaper, helped start the Toronto Women's Bookstore, was one of the founders of Cora the Women's Bookmobile, and the Toronto Women's Centre. Judith later wrote for Broadside and worked on the LOOT project. She started the All Girls Hit and Run Feminist Marching Band and joined the Wages for Housework group and started Wages Due Lesbians.

After stepping away from these groups, she wrote poetry and songs (including the Mama Quilla name song) and then moved to rural British Columbia, where she worked with the 100 Mile House Women's Centre, acted as the editor of The Open Door (Rural Lesbians of BC), and got involved in choirs and music teaching. She later moved back to Vancouver and then Victoria where she currently resides.

Greenberg, Shirley E.

  • Canada
  • Persoon
  • 1931-

Shirley Elizabeth (E.) Greenberg (née Schnell) was born to George Schnell and Elizabeth Bertha Schnell in 1931, in Ottawa, Ontario. In 1959 she was married to Irving Greenberg (1928-1991); she had three children.

Throughout her law studies and professional practice, Dr. Greenberg worked for women’s legal equality through advocacy, philanthropy and education.

In the early 1970s, Shirley E. Greenberg was inspired by second-wave feminism to pursue a law degree with the University of Ottawa. She attended law school as a mature, married student and as a mother of three. From March 14-16, 1974, Shirley E. Greenberg attended the founding conference of the National Association of Women and the Law (NAWL).

Working with the University of Ottawa’s NAWL chapter, Shirley E. Greenberg helped administer the organization’s 1975 summer project, delivering programs that raised awareness of the impact of legal inequities on women’s lives.

Shelley E. Greenberg also conducted research and wrote extensively about legal topics affecting women, such as child custody, family law, pensions, and unemployment insurance. She wrote for such feminist publications as “Upstream.”

Dr. Greenberg helped found the Ottawa Women’s Centre Association—a vital resource for community women. She also volunteered with Ottawa’s Rape Crisis Centre and Interval House.

After graduating from law school in 1976, Shirley E. Greenberg co-founded Ottawa’s first all-female law practice, in 1978. The law practice hosted women articling students, helping women establish law careers in male-dominated spaces. She was awarded an honourary doctorate from the University of Ottawa in 2003.

Shirley E. Greenberg also became a noted philanthropist. In 2005, she endowed the Shirley E. Greenberg Chair for Women and the Legal Profession in the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law, designated for feminist law faculty members. She established the Shirley E. Greenberg Women's Health Centre at the Ottawa Hospital’s Riverside campus, in 2005. In 2013 she funded the Shirley E. Greenberg Breast Cancer Imaging Suite at the Queensway Carleton Hospital. She established the Shirley E. Greenberg Resource Centre for Women at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre.

In 2014, Shirley Greenberg was awarded the Outstanding Individual Philanthropist honour by the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), in 2014. She was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2009 and awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, in 2012.

Webb, Nancy

  • Canada
  • Persoon
  • 1946-

Nancy Webb graduated from high school in 1963 and immediately entered the workforce. She was employed, at age 18, as a secretary for an electronics corporation in Etobicoke, Ontario. In 1979, Nancy Webb enrolled at York University while also working full-time, and later, while parenting her daughter; she graduated from York University in 1991.

In the spring of 1985 Nancy Webb attended a Women’s Studies’ course, Social Sciences 3580.06, taught by Dr. Meg Luxton. Subsequently, Nancy Webb worked as Fundraising and Community Relations Coordinator for the Elizabeth Fry Society in Toronto, for 30 years.

From ca. 1978-1980 Nancy also volunteered with the Lesbian Organization of Toronto. In 1984, she was part of the founding collective of the Notso Amazon Softball League in Toronto.

Working Women Community Centre

  • CA
  • Instelling
  • 1974-

Working Women Community Centre (WWCC) was created in June 1974 in Toronto’s West End to help newcomer women with pre-employment and employment counselling. The Centre was specifically created to help women from Portugal, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The original name of the Centre was Women’s Community Employment Centre.

WWCC has responded to the needs of women in Toronto’s newcomer communities with creative, yet pragmatic, programs and services. In 1978, WWCC sponsored the Working Skills Centre, a mailroom on-the-job training program.

In 1984, WWCC helped develop the South Asian Women’s Centre, providing settlement services to South Asian women in Toronto. From 1985-1989, WWCC partnered with Humber College to offer the Electronics Assembler Program [Immigrant Women Into Electronics], providing immigrant women with skills for entry level electronics positions.

Since 1980, WWCC has provided immigrant women with an English as a Second Language program and a Language Instruction for Newcomers program, as well as offering computer training.

From 1980-1985, WWCC sponsored Modistas Unidas Workshop, an informal collective of skilled Portuguese-speaking dressmakers. This professional dressmaking business created an exclusive high-quality women’s clothing line.

In 2005, WWCC and its partners facilitated the Baker/Patisserie pre-apprenticeship training program. WWCC also partnered with organizations, in 2007, to provide immigrant women with pre-apprenticeship carpentry training.

As of 2014, WWCC serves all newcomer communities across the city, with office locations in the Jane/Finch, Don Mills/Sheppard/Peanut Town, Bloor West, and Victoria Village communities.

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