Showing 148 results

Authority record

Fairholm, Linda Jean

  • Person
  • 18 May 1948-6 September 2018
Jean Fairholm was a as coordinator of World Interaction in which she worked to expand Canadian awareness of the potential for global justice. Her insight in this role was informed by her experience as a CUSO volunteer in Malawi. Her second calling as a massage therapist continued her lifelong focus on healing. Jean travelled extensively, to Hawaii, Scotland, Crete, New Zealand, Tibet and Manitoulin Island. She died in Ottawa on September 6, 2018.

Feminist Party of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-1982

The Feminist Party of Canada (FPC) developed during the feminist movement in response to a lack of representation of women in government and to the many injustices women and minorities continued to face. The party began on June 10, 1979 at an event held by a number of feminists at the Ontario Institute for the Study of Education (OISE), which attracted over 600 people. The event included readings and songs, as well as speeches delivered by Marg Evans, Angela Miles, Mary O'Brien and Laura Sabia.

The primary objective of the FPC was to have an impact on the political system by providing a feminist perspective, and in turn, tackle many of the neglected issues concerning women. The party quickly received attention from the media and was very active while it existed—holding events, sending out newsletters and flyers, communicating with politicians and fighting for official party status. Though the Feminist Party of Canada never became an official party, ending only three years after it began, the party influenced many women to become politically active and brought attention to numerous social, economic, political and educational issues affecting not only women, but all of society.

Finkler, Evelyn Lilith

  • Person
  • 1958-
Evelyn Lilith (now Chava) Finkler has been an activist, writer and academic. She was born in Toronto, in 1958, to a Polish father and Libyan mother, both of whom survived the holocaust. She is the granddaughter of a prominent Hassidic rabbi. For many years, Finkler was an orthodox Jew. Today, she belongs to a Conservative congregation. Members of her extended family reside in a Satmar community in the U.S.
Since 1976, Finkler has participated and organized in social justice movements dedicated to the liberation of women, lesbians, disabled persons and psychiatric survivors. She has often marched against apartheid in South Africa, Israel / Palestine and Canada. Finkler participated in feminist groups such as Women Against Violence Against Women, Lesbian Organization of Toronto, Women for Survival, Jewish Feminist Anti-Fascist League and the Disabled Womens’ Network-Toronto. She was also a co-founder and co-organizer of the very first Psychiatric Survivor Pride Day, now known and celebrated internationally as Mad Pride.
Chava has written almost fifty articles in academic journals, trade publications and the alternative press. Since 2000, much of her writing has focused on mental health and affordable housing. No matter the topic, however, Finkler has consistently presented an intersectional analysis, linking one form of oppression to others.
Finkler received an Interdisciplinary PhD from Dalhousie University in 2009. During her years of study, she received nine academic and / or community awards including the prestigious Trudeau Foundation Fellowship. During her retirement, Finkler continues to advocate for social justice in multiple political and activist arenas.

Fireweed

  • Corporate body
  • 1978-2002

Fireweed was founded in Toronto, Canada, in 1978 by a 24 women collective. Originally called Fireweed: A Women’s Literary and Cultural Journal, the journal adopted the name Fireweed: A Feminist Quarterly of Writing, Politics, Art & Culture in 1980. The foreword to the first issue described Fireweed as a “feminist journal devoted to stimulating dialogue, knowledge, and creativity among women” and stated that the journal’s collective was “committed to an editorial policy of diversity.” Collective members have included Gay Allison, Lynne Fernie, Hilda Kirkwood, Liz Brady, Elizabeth Ruth, Makeda Silvera, Carolyn Smart and Rhea Tregebov. Issues of Fireweed usually focuses on a theme or topic, such as "Writing" (#10), "Fear & Violence" (#14), "Women of Colour" (#16), "Sex & Sexuality" (#37 & 38), and "Language" (#44/45), though there are frequent "open" issues. They published the first collection of Jewish feminist works (#35) to critical acclaim. Beginning in 1982, Fireweed invited guest collectives to edit issues of the journal. This was an opportunity for under-represented groups to define their own issues.

Fireweed was committed to an editorial policy of diversity and not intended to represent a particular style or aesthetic. The collective was also committed to print both established and new women authors including works from native and immigrant communities. However, in the beginning of their history Fireweed did not completely adhere to this mandate. Most of their first issues included little or no works from writers of colour, native women, or immigrants. This exclusion created some adverse reactions from the community. By 1982, all but one woman resigned from the original collective and a new eight woman collective was formed. This collective, which included two women of colour, argued extensively about the aesthetics and contents of the journal. By the mid- to late-1980s and beyond, Fireweed began to paint a broader discussion of race, class, and sexuality. Several themed issues that gave voices to minority groups including two issues on Asian women’s writings, Lesbiantics: an issue for and by lesbian women, and a double issue on class. Even though they received letters about certain issues, themes, and writings, Fireweed never compromised their vision. The journal published fiction, poetry, reviews, essays, photographs, and drawings from women around the world. The collective encouraged women from every background to submit their works to the journal. They wanted women to articulate how they were perceived in popular culture. They had an extensive editorial system that involved a group consensus when considering submissions.

The Fireweed collective also wanted to encourage and support women to pursue writing and other arts. They continuously participated in the Ontario Arts Council’s Writer’s Reserve grant system that provided Fireweed the opportunity to recommend funding to writers for individual projects. Their continued work with the arts community created an annual Fireweed festival, which showcased various artists and works from the feminist community. The journal also showcased writing from a number of renowned Canadian artists including Margaret Atwood and Rina Fraticelli, the future head of Studio D at the NFB. Similarly to many other publications, the collective system was not entirely efficient or beneficial to the journal and began to show strain in 1983. By the mid-1990s a new organization was developed to better manage the publication of the journal. First, a 6-member editorial collective was responsible for the editorial direction especially with the development, solicitation, and selection of issue contents. The staff collective included coordinators for sales and marketing, editorials, office management, and the design of the journal itself. Finally the board collective as the legal entity was responsible for overall organizational and staff issues as well as all fiscal matters.

Fireweed was published from 1978 to 2002 with a final double issue on women, race, and war resistance. The quarterly's ISSN is 0706-3857.

Frajkor, Ján Juraj (George)

  • Person
  • 1934-

Ján Juraj (George) Frajkor was born in Montréal, Québec on February 8th, 1934. He is the son of Ján Frajkor and Mária Onderik, Slovak immigrants from the village of Juskova Voľa in Zemplín, Slovakia. In 1961, he earned a degree in English and Economics at Concordia University in Montréal, Québec. Afterwards, he completed further studies in various subjects including biology, organic chemistry, botany and East European studies at McGill University, the University of Montréal, Carleton University and the University of Ottawa.

From 1972 to 1999, Ján Juraj (George) Frajkor was a professor of journalism at Carleton University, a subject he also taught at Comenius University in Bratislava. In addition to his work as a professor, he worked as a reporter and editor at various news agencies such as the Penticton B.C. Herald, the Canadian Press News Agency and the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC). From 1999 to January 2011, Ján Juraj (George) Frajkor was also the Executive Director of Frajkor Enterprise.

A great supporter of the Canadian Slovak community, Ján Juraj (George) Frajkor has devoted his time and effort to various organizations. A member of the Canadian Slovak League (CSL) since the age of two, he has been its recording secretary and, from 2004 to 2007, its national president. He was also involved in the Slovak Canadian National Council (SCNC) and the Slovak World Congress (SWC). In addition to his work in various Slovak organization, Ján Juraj (George) has also published the newsletter "Slovotta" and was the chairman of the editorial committee of the newspaper "Kanadský Slovak," where he still publishes articles to this day.

Freeman, Barbara M.

  • Person
Barbara M. Freeman holds a Bachelor of Journalism degree and a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She graduated with a Ph.D. in History from Concordia University in Montreal. She began teaching at Carleton University in Ottawa in 1980 after a career in broadcast journalism. As an adjunct research professor of journalism at Carleton University, her key research areas were communications history, and gender and diversity issues in the media in the School of Journalism and Communication. She is the author of Beyond Bylines: Media Workers and Women’s Rights in Canada (2011), The Satellite Sex: The Media and Women’s Issues in English Canada, 1966-1971 (2001), and of Kit’s Kingdom: the Journalism of Kathleen Blake Colema (1989). In these essays, she examines historical cases of women who worked in print and broadcast media and were committed activists as well. Her case studies illustrate how the language and foci of women’s rights have changed from the late 19th century until the year 2000 as her subjects sought equality in education, suffrage, fair employment practices, reproductive and sexual freedom, and the rights of indigenous women. She has also published articles in several anthologies and journals. She is a founding and executive member of the Media and Communication History Committee and a member of the Canadian Committee on Women’s History.

Frize, Monique

  • Person
  • 1942-

Monique Frize, née Aubry (1942 - ), is a Canadian researcher and engineer in the biomedical field. She was the first women to study engineering at the University of Ottawa and graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science (Electrical Engineering) in 1966. She received an Athlone Fellowship and completed a Master’s in Philosophy in Electrical Engineering (Engineering in Medicine) at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London (United Kingdom), a Master’s of Business Administration at the University of Moncton (New Brunswick), and a doctorate from Erasmus Universiteit in Rotterdam (The Netherlands).

Monique Frize worked as a clinical engineer for 18 years. She started her career at the Hôpital Notre-Dame in Montreal. In 1979, she was appointed Director of the Regional Clinical Engineering Service in Moncton (New Brunswick) and became the first Chair of the Division of Clinical Engineering for the International Federation of Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) in 1985. In 1989, she was appointed the first holder of the national Northern Telecom/NSERC Chair for women in engineering at the University of New Brunswick, and professor in the Electrical department. In 1990, she was named chair of the Canadian Committee for Women in Engineering (CCWE). In 1997, she joined Carleton University, as a Professor in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, and the University of Ottawa, as a Professor in the School of Information Technology and Engineering. She also held the Ontario NSERC/Nortel Chair for women in science and engineering. She is a founding member of International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES) and was its president between 2002 and 2008. In 2007, she founded INWES Education and Research Institute (ERI) and has been its president since then.

As a biomedical engineer, Monique Frize is knowledgeable in medical instruments and decision support systems. She developed a software program to predict complications in premature babies and perfected a technique that uses an infrared camera to detect the presence of arthritis. Throughout her career, she has been active in promoting women in leadership roles in science and engineering. As a role model for women engineers, she taught, conducted research, and lead campaigns to encourage young women to pursue careers in engineering. She is the author of more than 200 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals and proceedings. She has published several books such as The Bold and the Brave: A history of women in science and engineering (2009), Laura Bassi and Science in 18th Century Europe (2013), Ethics for Bioengineers (2011), and Health Care Engineering Parts I and II (2013). She has received many honours and awards including honorary doctorates from several Canadian Universities. She was inducted as Officer of the Order of Canada in 1993.

Fulford, Margaret

  • Person
  • 1960-
Margaret Fulford worked at Canadian Women's Movement Archives, the Music Library of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Toronto Reference Library, and the Canadian Health Network. She edited The Canadian Women’s Movement, 1960-1990: A Guide to Archival Resources (1992). She co-developed the subject thesaurus of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (2001). She was Faculty Librarian at U of T’s Dental Library and currently is the University College Librarian at the University of Toronto.

Gallagher, Dawna

  • Person
Dawna Gallagher-Moore was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She is a visual and performance artist, and also a visual researcher of Canadian cultural history. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), and a Masters of Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She has completed doctoral studies and an oral examination in Canadian History at the University of Ottawa. In 1986, she received the Brucebo Canadian-Scandinavian Scholarship for landscape painting and spent a summer painting and bicycling around Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea. She worked for Library and Archives Canada. She also has taught painting, drawing, watercolour, cartooning and art history. She is best known for her cryptic, witty, and pointed cartoons published in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Ottawa, and New-York. She now runs TreeTop Art Studio, which offers workshops and art classes for children and adults in Ottawa, Ontario. She is married to the writer and editor John P. Moore.

Gammon, Carolyn

  • Person
Carolyn Gammon is an author and activist, who was born and raised in Fredericton, New Brunswick. Her parents, Frances (Firth) Gammon and Donald Gammon were co-founders of The Fiddlehead magazine at the University of New Brunswick. She completed her MA in Literature and Creative Writing at Concordia University. She challenged the nomenclature of degree title, claiming a “Master” title was sexist. She garnered national attention and her graduation in 1994 was covered by CBC TV and she received the “Guinea Pig Award” for the most innovative contribution to Concordia University life. She was also the founder of the Lesbian Studies Coalition of Concordia in Montreal. She worked to link the struggle against heterosexism and lesbophobia.
She wrote “The Perfect Guest” dedicated to the fourteen women killed in the Montreal Massacre. She published her first book of poetry “Lesbians Ignited” in 1992. The book has become a classic in Canadian lesbian literature. In 1992, she was invited to Berlin as an author and continued to live in Germany. Carolyn Gammon’s poetry, prose, and essays have appeared in anthologies throughout Canada, the United States, and Europe. In many readings and performances on three continents over three decades, she has presented her work in a political, humorous and engaging style.
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