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Conant, Verna Rowena (Smith) (1888-1992)

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  • April 23, 1888-May, 1992
Verna Rowena Conant (née Smith) was born on April 23, 1888, the daughter of Ernest Disraeli Smith and Christina Ann Smith (1861-1932). Her mother was the first President of the Women Institute of Canada in Winona Division, Ontario. She has one brother, Brigadier Armand Armstrong Smith. Verna Rowena Smith studied at Toronto's Havergal College and then lived in Ottawa where her father served as an MP. She met her future husband at her coming out party in 1911 at Hederleigh, the family House, in Grimsby, Ontario. She married Gordon Daniel Conant (1895-1953) on June 25, 1913, in Wentworth County, Ontario. Gordon Daniel Conant was a lawyer from Oshawa, future Mayor of Oshawa, attorney general of Ontario and Premier of Ontario from October 6, 1937 to June 30, 1943. While raising her family, Verna Rowena Conant became active in her community and organizations. She became Honorary president of the Oshawa General Hospital of the women's auxiliary, the Women's Institute, the Oshawa Historical Society and the Girl Guides. She played an important role with the St. John Ambulance and received the title of Dame of the Order of St. John. Verna Rowena Conant and her husband had 3 children; Geneviève, Douglas and Roger. Verna Rowena Conant died in Oshawa in May 1992 and is buried in Oshawa Union Cemetery.

Gallagher, Dawna

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Dawna Gallagher-Moore was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She is a visual and performance artist, and also a visual researcher of Canadian cultural history. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), and a Masters of Canadian Studies from Carleton University. She has completed doctoral studies and an oral examination in Canadian History at the University of Ottawa. In 1986, she received the Brucebo Canadian-Scandinavian Scholarship for landscape painting and spent a summer painting and bicycling around Sweden’s Gotland Island in the Baltic Sea. She worked for Library and Archives Canada. She also has taught painting, drawing, watercolour, cartooning and art history. She is best known for her cryptic, witty, and pointed cartoons published in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Ottawa, and New-York. She now runs TreeTop Art Studio, which offers workshops and art classes for children and adults in Ottawa, Ontario. She is married to the writer and editor John P. Moore.

Clennet-Sirois, Laurence

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Laurence Clennett-Sirois is a sociologist and independent scholar focusing on gender and women's studies. She was awarded her Bachelor of Social Sciences from Université du Québec en Outaouais in 2005, her Masters in Sociology and Women's studies from University of Ottawa in 2008, and her PhD in Gender Studies from the University of Sussex in 2013. She worked as a part-time lecturer at Université du Québec en Outaouais from 2012-2018. In 2018, Clennett-Sirois is currently working as a policy analyst for Status of Women Canada.

McPeake, Wendy

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Wendy McPeake was involved in the creation of cultural products, including museum exhibits, revenue-generating publications and products, promotional publications, and commercial operations. She obtained a Bachelor of Art in English Literature from the University of Ottawa in 1971 and also studied at the Université d’Aix-en-Provence in 1972 and 1973, as well as completing courses in management publishing. In the late 1970s, Wendy McPeake was involved in various groups and organizations working on women's issues. She was very active in the Ottawa Women's Centre, frequently sitting on the Policy Committee. She was involved in organizing various events, including a musical fundraiser in 1977 with the artists Angele Arsenault, CT & April, and Ellen McIllwaine, as well as another concert fundraiser that featured Rita MacNeil.

Wendy McPeake founded and was a very active member of the Political Action Collective, renamed the Feminist Action Collective in 1981. She worked as a marketing manager at the National Museums of Canada (1980 to 1984), as Assistant to the Director of Publishing at McClelland and Stewart publishing house (1984-1985), as Director, Publishing and Product Development at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology Corporation (1985-1995), and as Director Commercial Operations at the Canada Museum of Science and Technology Corporation (1994-1998). She is currently a freelance publishing consultant and editor.

Hansson, Carolyn

  • Persoon
  • 1941-
Born in Hazel Grove, Cheshire, England, she obtained a B. SC Engineering in 1961 and a PH.D. in Physical Metallurgy in 1966 from the Imperial College, London University. She was the first female student in the Royal School of Mines at Imperial College and the first woman to graduate with a PH.D. in metallurgy.

Nancy Ruth

  • Persoon
  • 1942-

The Honourable Nancy Ruth, CM, LLD, is a feminist, social activist and feminist philanthropist. She worked for the United Church of Canada from 1963-1986 as well as in various church organizations. From 2005 to 2017, she served as an Ontario Senator in the Senate of Canada.

Born in Toronto on 6 January 1942, and christened Nancy Ruth Jackman, she chooses to be called Nancy Ruth as a single name in 1994, the day her mother died. She is the daughter of Mary Coyne Rowell Jackman, known for her support of Canadian art, craft, culture, and early childhood education, and Harry Jackman, former MP (1940-1949) and financier. She is the granddaughter of Nellie Langford Rowell, a pioneering advocate for women, children and the poor, and Newton Wesley Rowell, former MPP, MP and Ontario Liberal Party leader.
Her paternal grandfather, Henry B. Jackman, rose in the ranks of The Taylor [Chubb] Safe Company, while her paternal grandmother, Sara Ann, did church and volunteer work.

A United Church Minister by training and an activist by choice, Nancy Ruth is a leading advocate of the incorporation of Canada’s constitutional equality rights into Canadian public policy and institutions. She co-founded, and served as a director and officer of organizations devoted to achieving full civil, legal, economic, political, and cultural rights for women and girls in all their diversity, including:
• CREF-Charter of Rights Educational Fund and CORC-Charter of Rights Coalition
• The 1981 Ad Hoc Committee of Canadian Women on the Constitution
• LEAF-Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund/Fonds d’action et d’éducation juridiques pours les femmes.
• CWF- Canadian Women’s Foundation/ Fondation Canadienne pours les femmes
• The Linden School
• Nancy’s Very Own Foundation, which focuses on poverty, violence, health and peace
• Women’s Future Fund/ Les Fonds pour l’avenir des femmes
• www.section15.ca, an online women's’ history site.
• Play Fair – a film about women in sport
• www.singallofus.ca – a site dedicated to making O Canada (Canada’s national anthem) gender-neutral

Nancy Ruth has served on the Board of Directors of the Economic Council of Canada, the Canadian Centre for Arms Control, the Canada-USA Fulbright Foundation, The Doctor's Hospital Foundation, Mount Saint Vincent University, the International Institute of Concern for Public Health, and the Paralympic Foundation.

As a Senator, she successfully advocated for the addition of sex, age and disability to Canada’s Criminal Code provisions on hate propaganda; improved gender-based analysis for all federal policies and programs; access to medically assisted dying; and, the 2018 restoration of a gender-neutral English national anthem.

As a businesswoman, she has been involved with residential land development and environmental products.

Nancy Ruth ran as a Progressive Conservative candidate in the 1990 Ontario election and in a 1993 Ontario by-election. In 1993, she represented Canada at the UN elections in Cambodia.

Nancy Ruth has made significant donations to various feminist educational, health, cultural, museum and archival activities.

Nancy Ruth’s contributions to social change have been recognized nationally and internationally. She was awarded the Order of Canada (1994); the Governor General's Award in Commemoration of the Person's Case (1997); the Augusta Stowe Gullen Medal (2014); the Government of Ontario’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Human Rights (1998); the Toronto YWCA Women of Distinction Award (1988); the Hero Award, Metropolitan Community Church, Toronto (2000); the South African Women for Women Friendship Award (2004); and the Charles Sauriol Greenspace Award (2007). She served as a Fellow of the Simone de Beauvoir Institute, Concordia University, Montreal, (1991). She holds honorary degrees from York, Trent, Laurentian and Mount Saint Vincent Universities.

Adamson, Nancy

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Nancy Lee Adamson was a professor, university administrator, and a founding member of the Canadian Women's Movement Archive Collective and its predecessor, the Women's Information Centre (WIC). She holds degrees from Mt. Holyoke College, Emory University, and the University of Toronto, receiving her PhD in 1983. At the University of Toronto, she established the Sexual Harassment Office and worked as a counsellor. From 1991 to 2000 she worked at Carleton University (Ottawa, Ont.) in the Status of Women Office and Equity Services. She is currently working in university administration in Belize.

Yaffe, Debby (Deborah)

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  • 1943-
Debby (Deborah) Yaffe is a feminist, activist and retired University of Victoria Department of Women’s Studies senior instructor. Yaffe (née Frisch) was born in 1943 and grew up in Southern California. She attended University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in the 1960s. Taking her husband’s last name, Gregory, she and her husband lived in Europe with their son, moving to London in the 1970s. It was there, while working as a teacher, that Yaffe became involved in the women’s movement through her attendance at consciousness-raising group meetings. She subsequently formed her own group and took part in feminist actions. Yaffe later returned to the United States on her own and eventually settled in Victoria, British Columbia, with her family. After her divorce, she took her mother’s maiden name, Yaffe. In Victoria, she volunteered with Everywomen's Books, worked as a paid staff member for the local office of the Victoria Status of Women Action Group, from 1986 to 1988, and was involved in organizing around key issues such as abortion rights. Yaffe was approached to teach Introduction to Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 1990 and she retired in 2004. She holds a master’s degree in Women’s Studies and is a 2001 recipient of UVic Alumni Association’s award for excellence in teaching. Yaffe is one of the founders, along with former university archivist Jane Turner, of the Victoria Women’s Movement Archives at UVic Archives.

Gellman, Steven

  • Persoon
  • 1947-
Steven Gellman is a Canadian composer, pianist, and former professor of composition and theory at the University of Ottawa. Gellman was born in Toronto (1947) where he began studying piano and composition at an early age under the instruction of Dr. Samuel Dolin. He appeared frequently as a pianist and composer throughout his teens. At the age of 16, he appeared as a soloist with the CBC Symphony Orchestra in a performance of his own composition Concerto for Piano and Orchestra. Gellman won the International BMI award in 1964, making him the first Canadian to be awarded the accolade.
Gellman studied at Juilliard in New York City under Vincent Persichetti, Luciano Berio and Roger Sessions from 1965 to 1968. He attended the Aspen Music Festival and School during the summers of 1965 and 1966 as a student of Darius Milhaud. In 1973, Gellman entered the Paris Conservatory where he studied with Olivier Messiaen from 1973 to 1976. During his time at the Conservatory, Gellman was awarded the Premier Prix. In 1970, Gellman’s piece Mythos for flute and string quartet won the UNESCO prize for the best work by a composer under the age of 25. In 1975, Gellman’s work Chori was premiered by the Toronto Symphony.
Gellman returned to Canada in 1976 and began teaching composition and theory at the University of Ottawa. He composed several pieces in the late 70s, notably Poème for Angela Hewitt; Wind Music, commissioned by the Canadian Brass; and Deux Tapisseries, commissioned by the French Government in honor of Olivier Messiaen’s 70th birthday in 1978.
Gellman received two commission from the Toronto Symphony in the 80s. The overture Awakening was premiered in 1983, and was featured during Toronto Symphony’s European tour of 1983. The second commission resulted in a five movement work for orchestra featuring the synthesizers of the Canadian Electronic Ensemble as soloists. The work was premiered in 1986, and was performed throughout Canada. Shortly after, Gellman received a commission from Jon Kimura Parker, which led to the composition Keyboard Triptych for Piano and Synthesizer. Gellman was named the Canada Council Composer of the Year in 1987.
Gellman became an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa in 1984 and was promoted to Full Professor in 1994. While teaching, Gellman continued to compose many works that have been performed throughout Canada and internationally, by ensembles such as the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Musica Camerata, Société de musique contemporaine du Québec (SMCQ), the Ottawa Symphony, and the Gryphon Trio. Gellman retired from his position at the University of Ottawa in 2011 as Professor Emeritus. His most recent work was completed in 2014.
Prior to his position at the University, Gellman travelled extensively throughout the world. In addition to his studies abroad, he spent time in places such as New Zealand, the Middle East, Greece, India, South Africa, Morocco, and Europe. In his early 20s, Gellman married Cheryl, a visual artist, with whom he had two children, Dana and Misha. Gellman remains a resident of Ottawa.

Bray, Arthur

  • Persoon
  • 1925-
Arthur Bray, who was born in Ottawa and graduated from Lisgar Collegiate, began his flying career as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II, later transferring to the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. He was serving as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1947 when there were frequent reports of Flying Saucers, later to become known as Unidentified Flying Objects or UFOs. He became curious about these reports, wondering what strange things may be flying about the same sky he was. The more he read, the more interested he became, and the study became his hobby, and, eventually, an avocation. This study inevitably resulted in the accumulation of a large collection of research material over the period to 1993. He completed his first book, Science, the Public and the UFO, (Bray Book Service, Ottawa) in 1967. It was written, after twenty years of research, as a challenge to the U.S. Air Force.
He frequently appeared on radio and TV, was a guest speaker at many meetings of clubs and associations, including, on occasion, sharing the podium with noted scientists. He also presented papers to international UFO conferences and taught a course on Ufology at Algonquin College in Ottawa. Articles about Bray and his work appeared in newspapers across Canada as well as in the U.S.A. In 1967 he was awarded the Centennial Medal in recognition of his service to Canada in the Navy.
In 1968, he began a lengthy correspondence with U. Thant, Secretary-General of the United Nations, and with the UN Outer Space Affairs Division, to get the UN to set up a full-time study of UFOs. Eventually, after supporting a proposal by the Prime Minister of Grenada, the UN asked all member nations to conduct UFO investigations on a national level and report back to the UN. Bray asked Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau to support this action, but nothing came of it.
Then in 1969, he presented a detailed outline of the UFO problem, in the form of a brief, to The Senate Committee on Science Policy, titled Science, Society and the UFO (The Queen’s Printer, Ottawa). In addition to numerous articles in UFO research journals and magazines, he contributed four articles to the Encyclopaedia of UFOs, (Doubleday & Co. Inc., Garden City, N.Y. 1980). In 1979, he wrote his second book, The UFO Connection, (Jupiter Publishing, Ottawa, 1979).
Bray, through his published work, gradually became recognized around the world as a thorough researcher. One of the leading UFO investigative organizations, the Aerial Phenomena Research Organization (APRO) based in the U.S.A., described Bray as “... one of the most respected UFO investigator - researchers in the world...”. (The APRO Bulletin, vol. 31, no. 2, January 1983).
To keep current on scientific and technical matters, he held membership in various organizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The New York Academy of Sciences, the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, and The Society of American Military Engineers. The Society of Technical Writers and Publishers and the academy of Independent Scholars also admitted him in membership based on his writing and research abilities.
Through a thorough and detailed study of the evidence, Bray became convinced of the reality of UFOs in that something which remains unidentified is intruding into our airspace. After thorough investigation, only about ten percent of reported sightings remain unidentified. The remaining ninety percent can be identified as man-made objects, known natural phenomenon or hoaxes. It is the ten percent that are the true UFOs, the others being IFOs (Identified Flying Objects). The answers to the questions of what these objects are and where they come from remain unknown to the world in general. Bray, however, is convinced that many governments have the answers, and these remain under top-secret wraps for whatever reasons. He, as well as other researchers, have discovered and published much proof of this secrecy.
When he retired from the Navy in 1971, Bray embarked on a second career as a manager with the Canada Safety Council, a non-government, non-profit organization. He retired from the Council in 1987 in the position of Director of Corporate Affairs. Since then, he continued researching and writing, but also in a new field, financial planning, and has two books published on that topic by the largest financial publishing house in Canada. He is now engaged on another major project of research and writing unrelated to his previous topic areas.
Bray retired from active UFO research after forty-six years of thorough study because no amount of private research had produced any final answers due to the cover-up, which continues, and he had other interests to pursue which had been set aside for many years due to his active involvement in Ufology.
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