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Lerato Legoabe speaking at the Canadian Forum on Women's Activism in Constitutional and Democratic Reform, 2006, Parliament Hill, Ottawa

This video documents Lerato Legoabe, Coordinator of GirlsNet, South Africa, speaking at the Canadian Forum on Women’s Activism in Constitutional and Democratic Reform on February 14th, 2006, Parliament Hill, Ottawa. The event was an intergenerational forum on democratic renewal to produce forward looking strategies in a global context for intergenerational women’s equality rights. Lerato states in the video: "[...] I want to end with three challenges and, like I did yesterday, I want to cluster them together. The issue of access to information. The issue of violence against women because I feel violence against women, as a South African and I think, as a young woman of the world, is a very big challenge that many governments, civil society and people in general are struggling to deal with and I feel that, as the young women's movement, we need to be a voice that has a position on this issue. We also need to come up with strategies that will influence some of the activism that needs to happen on the ground on this issue: HIV AIDS and its link to violence against women, child trafficking (it's now called modern day slavery). We need to have a position on that. [...]" The 2006 forum was held in the same room on Parliament Hill as the 1981 Women’s Constitutional Conference twenty-five years prior. The 2006 forum was attended by original members of Ad Hoc Committee of Canadian Women and the Constitution (who organized the 1981 conference) along with parliamentarians, students and other activists over the course of two days.

Interview with Murwarid Ziayee

This video documents an interview with Murwarid Ziayee, director for Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan, Kabul. The interviewer is assumed to be [Susan Bazilli? director of the International Women’s Rights Project (IWRP), University of Victoria]. The video was made available on IWRP’s website under the section titled 'Afghanistan' (http://iwrp.org/projects/afghanistan/)

Sharon McIvor talk at the Centre for Feminist Legal Studies, University of British Columbia, 2010

This video documents a talk given by Sharon McIvor on the McIvor v. Canada case at the Centre for Feminist Legal Studies, University of British Columbia in 2010. Sharon McIvor is a member of the Lower Nicola Indian Band and Nlaka'pamux Nation. Sharon is known for her activism against sex-based discrimination to Indigenous women and children and reform in Canadian legislation. Notably the Bill C-3: 2011 Amendments to the Indian Act which grant 6(2) Indian status to grandchildren of women who regained status in 1985. This amendment to the Indian Act was the government of Canada's response to the McIvor v. Canada case. Sharon's activism for equality for Indigenous women was recognized by Canada’s Governor General in 2011. Sharon is a lawyer and has taught at the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology in Merritt, British Columbia.

Global conversations with Sally Armstrong: Interview with Dr. Sima Samar

This video documents an interview with Dr. Sima Simar, chairperson of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission. The interview was conducted by Sally Armstrong at the Canadian Forum on Women’s Activism in Constitutional and Democratic Reform on February 14th, 2006, Parliament Hill, Ottawa. The description for the video on the Constitute.ca website reads: "Dr. Sima Samar is the Chairperson of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission. A medical doctor, she set up illegal clinics for women and girls under the Taliban, and has dedicated her life to the liberation of women from the repressive Taliban and Afghan regimes. She was briefly appointed as the Deputy Prime Minister of Afghanistan and the Minister of Women’s Affairs after the first democratic elections in 2004." The video is supplementary interview material for the documentary film Constitute!. Constitute.ca is a project of the International Women’s Rights Project (IWRP), University of Victoria.

Darlington Hex

Video with no sound filmed by Judith Quinlan on a Super 8 Camera of a small hexing circle organized by Judith for a group of feminist climate activist (possibly the Women Against Nuclear Power group in Toronto) at a large anti-nuclear protest against the Darlington Nuclear Power Plant (today called Darlington Nuclear Generating Station) in Clarington, Ontario. Judith Quinlan writes "We made a hexing circle at the protest to close the Darlington Nuclear Power Plant." Video depicts protesters in a large field during summer and a smaller group playing instruments, waving cylinder tubes, and forming a hexing circle. Judith Quinlan writes “One of the speakers in the week leading up to it was Ursula Franklin. The hex was a small portion of that protest. It was organized by me and a group of feminists who were also climate activists.” Other people seen in the video are Gay Bell, Anne Quigley, Ellen Quigley, Jacqueline Frewin, Pat Smith, and Maureen Sanderson. Gay Bell writes in an article titled “Witches ANT: Anti-nuclear guerilla theatre” on page 7 of the October/November 1979 issue of UPSTREAM that the guerilla theater section of Women Against Nuclear Power called Witches ANT is putting on a play called “Sizzle City: Women’s Nuclear Reactions”. Gay Bell writes “The Witches' ANT came together to do anti-nuclear theater after the June occupation of the Darlington Nuclear Plant site near Toronto.”

Gay Days

Video with no sound of a celebration titled Gay Days in Queen's Park, Toronto filmed by Judith Quinlan on a Super 8 Camera. The video shows a sunny day in Queen's Park with booths for different organizations like the Lesbian Organization of Toronto (LOOT) and Toronto Area Gays (a peer counseling and information service). Also shown is Lorna Boschman giving a speech on a stage at the beginning and people sitting and walking in the park.

International Womens Day Toronto 1979

Video with no sound filmed by Judith Quinlan on a Super 8 Camera depicts a group of protestors holding signs on International Women's Day standing in front of Toronto Old City Hall.

Remembrance Day

Video with sound filmed by Judith Quinlan on a Super 8 Camera . Video depicts large gatherings and events for Remembrance Day in Toronto in front of [Old City Hall?]. Colour footage of people placing flowers by a sign with the female gender symbol with the words written "For Every Woman Raped in Every War". Black and white footage depicts soldiers in uniform performing a ceremony with the Canadian flag and drums.

Dr. Carrie Best speaking at the Women's Constitutional Conference, February 14th, 1981, Parliament Hill, Ottawa

This video documents Dr. Carrie Best speaking at the Women's Constitutional Conference on February 14, 1981 held on Parliament Hill, Ottawa. Dr. Best was the president of the Visible Minority Women's Society of Nova Scotia and co-founded the Clarion in 1946, one of the first newspapers owned and published by Black Canadians in Nova Scotia. The description titled "Equality and Racialized Women in Canada" on Constitute.ca reads: "The marginalization of racialized women still continues in Canada. See what Dr. Carrie Best said in 1981 and Joanne St. Lewis in 2006. We still have a long way to go in Canada to address the racism in our society." Constitute.ca was a project of the International Women’s Rights Project (IWRP), University of Victoria. Dr. Best states in the video: " I really don't need to tell you that I represent a minority group, because I happen to be the only one here representing the Black women of Canada. But that's not exactly ... Correction... and an apology… Over thirty years ago, I came here when Anne Francis had her conference, and I was definitely then, the lone representative of the Black women of Canada, and I presented a brief on their behalf, and I've come a long distance today, and I find that there is only one more of us here, and I think that should tell us something as women of Canada. Now 78, I'm still only number two. I would like to commend the Native Women's Association for their resolution, and I would like to quote this for you ..." At this point in the video the chairman states: "Dr. Best, excuse me but at this point in the agenda please, questions of clarification." Then Dr. Best goes on to state in the video: "Well this is a question of clarification if you'll permit me to read it. [...] [Dr. Best reads a quote from the charter on Indigenous rights and freedoms] Then Dr. Best states in the video: "[...] and I am suggesting madam chairman, that not only do we deny the existence of certain rights, but it appears that you have denied the very existence of the Black women of Canada."
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